Connecticut Proposes Deaf Child Bill of Rights to Address Education Gap

Deaf and hard of hearing (HOH) children generally do not differ cognitively from their peers in a way that would prevent them from learning the same material just as well. So why is it that in Connecticut, as well as other locations, children with hearing disabilities appear to be falling behind hearing children in state tests? In 2011, approximately 71 to 81 percent of children with hearing disabilities failed to reach state standards in Connecticut Mastery Tests (CMTs) and Connecticut Academic Performance Tests (CAPTs). Comparatively, between 35 to 58 percent of hearing students failed to meet the goals.

The answer, according to advocates for deaf and HOH persons, is not the disability itself, but the manner in which the children are being taught.  According to Terry Bedard, president of Hear Here Hartford, a deaf advocacy group, “Their needs are not being addressed in the way they should be, and that’s resulting in this wide achievement gap.” Advocates believe that since there is a relatively “low incidence” of hearing disabilities, they are commonly overlooked. In Connecticut, approximately 700 children are registered with the education department as having a hearing disability; however, the number could be greater since such students are not tracked carefully.

Consequently, the Connecticut General Assembly’s education committee will be considering legislation this term to address the gap. “A Deaf Child Bill of Rights,” introduced by the Connecticut Council of Organizations Serving the Deaf, would focus on an individualized education program (IEP) centered around each student’s communication and language needs. Each student’s IEP would be connected to a formal “Language and Communication Plan” that would address that child’s specific needs. The measure would also require that the team implementing the IEP includes at least one educational professional who specializes in hearing disabilities. The bill would compel the state to execute a more specific tracking system in order to better identify hearing disabled children and chart their academic progress.

If the bill is passed, Connecticut will be the 12th state in the country to implement a deaf child bill of rights, joining California, Colorado, Delaware, Georgia, Louisiana, Montana, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Dakota and Texas.