Official Testifies About HRSA’s Health Workforce Investments, Goals, Successes

On April 9, 2014, Rebecca Spitzgo, Associate Administrator of the Bureau of Health Professions in the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), testified before a Senate Subcommittee on Primary Health and Aging regarding the nation’s primary care workforce needs and HRSA’s activities and in this area. In light of recent investments from the American Reinvestment Recovery Act of 2009 (ARRA) (P.L. 111-5) and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) (P.L. 111-148), Spitzgo’s testimony focused on: (1) recent investments to strengthen the primary care workforce; (2) new efforts to build a primary care workforce; (3) diversity programs; and (4) training for comprehensive primary care.

HRSA’s Mission and Focus

An agency of HHS, HRSA is the primary federal agency for improving access to health care services for people who are uninsured, isolated or medically vulnerable. HRSA was created in 1982, when the Health Resources Administration and the Health Services Administration were merged. Its stated mission is to improve health and achieve health equity through access to quality services, a skilled health workforce, and innovative programs. In its efforts to strengthen the health care workforce, HRSA’s workforce programs emphasize the training of the next generation of primary care providers, strengthening up the primary care training and development infrastructure, providing incentives for students to choose primary care and to practice where the Nation needs them most, and repaying loans for primary care providers willing to work in some of the Nation’s most underserved areas.

Recent Investments to Strengthen the Primary Care Workforce

In her testimony, Spitzgo stated that, to date, ACA and ARRA investments have resulted in:

  • the training of an additional 1,700 primary care providers, including physicians, advanced practice nurses, and physician assistants, as well as 200 behavioral health providers;
  • the doubling of the numbers of clinicians in the National Health Service Corps (NHSC) from 3,600 in 2008 to nearly 8,900 in 2013; and
  • nearly 1,600 advanced practice nurses in the NHSC and nearly 2,600 nurses in the NURSE Corps working in high need communities.

Spitzgo also noted that the ACA provides $230 million over five years to fund the Teaching Health Center Graduate Medical Education (GME) program, which has expanded residency training for primary care residents and dentists in community-based ambulatory patient care settings, including HRSA-funded health centers. According to Spitzgo, this program supported more than 300 primary care resident full-time equivalents (FTEs) in 21 states in academic year 2013-2014, and is expected to support nearly 600 FTEs in academic year 2014-2015.

New Efforts to Build a Primary Care Workforce

Spitzgo testified as to the several new programs and initiatives to build a better primary care workforce contained in the President’s FY 2015 Budget, including:

  • A workforce initiative to support the training of 13,000 new physicians by 2024 and grow NHSC clinicians from 8,900 in 2013 to 15,000 in by FY 2015.
  • A new residency program, the Targeted Support for GME program, will build on the Teaching Health Center GME program, focusing on residency training in ambulatory, preventive care delivered in team-based settings. This new program includes a $100 million set aside for children’s hospitals in FYs 2015-2016, to be distributed via formula that will continue to support the same types of disciplines currently funded through the Children’s Hospitals GME Payment program.
  • Continued support of the NHSC.
  • A new $10 million Clinical Training in Interprofessional Practice program, which will support community-based clinical training in interprofessional, team-based care setting.
  • $4 million for the Rural Physician Training Grant program to provide support for medical schools to recruit and train students interested in rural practice.

Diversity Programs

In her testimony, Spitzgo stressed HRSA’s success in facilitating a diverse healthcare workforce. She offered the following statistics:

  • Underrepresented minorities and individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds accounted for approximately 45 percent of those who completed HRSA’s health professions training and education programs during 2012-2013.
  • More than half of the nearly 1,100 NHSC scholars and residents in the pipeline are minorities.
  • In FY 2013, African American physicians represented 17.8 percent of the Corps physicians, which exceeds their 6.3 percent representation within the national physician workforce.
  • In FY 2013, Hispanic physicians represented 15.7 percent of the Corps physicians, exceeding their 5.5 percent representation in the national physician workforce.

Training for Comprehensive Primary Care

Spitzgo’s testimony focused on HRSA investments to support the behavioral health disciplines and the integration of oral health into primary care. With regard to behavioral health, she noted that:

  • NHSC providers (including health service psychologists, licensed clinical social workers, licensed professional counselors, marriage and family therapists, and psychiatric nurse specialists) have increased from 700 in 2008 to 2,440 in 2013.
  • If they count psychiatrists, psychiatric physician assistants, and psychiatric nurse practitioners, more than 2,800 out of nearly 8,900 clinicians in NHSC (as of September 30, 2013) provide behavioral health services.
  • A partnership between HRSA and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) will train and provide placement assistance for approximately 1,800 additional behavioral health professionals and 1,700 behavioral health paraprofessionals.

Spitzgo further testified that HRSA funds several programs that support training and education necessary to improve the integration of dental care into primary care. Sptizgo also noted that approximately 75 percent of the more than 1,300 dentists and dental hygienists in NHSC work at health centers or health center look-alikes.