Little Progress in Reducing Deaths from Preventable Medical Errors

While progress is being made in certain areas of preventable hospital errors, such as dramatic reductions in the rate of central line infections and other hospital associated infections, the overall death rate from preventable medical errors  has not decreased much since the Institutes of Medicine’s (IOM) landmark report, To Err is Human was released nearly 15 years ago. This was the conclusion of a panel of medical experts who testified before the Subcommittee on Primary Health and Aging of the Senate’s Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions at a hearing on July 17, 2014. In fact, the rate may even have increased.

Preventable Errors

Witnesses referred to three studies conducted  from 2011 to 2013 which showed that the number of deaths at hospitals from preventable errors may actually be as high as 400,000 annually, which is significantly higher than the 98,000 annual deaths the IOM report estimated.  The 400,000 number comes from a study conducted by Dr. John James which was published in the Journal of Patient Safety in September of 2013.  Dr. James testified that he got to that number from some pretty simple math. “There were 34 million hospitalizations in 2007, of which approximately 0.9% involved lethal adverse events, and of those approximately 69 percent on average were judged to be preventable,” said Dr. James during his testimony.  He concluded that this leads to 210,000 deaths from preventable medical errors. When he corrected for the missed deaths from medical errors that current tools do not catch, the number came out to be something more like 400,000 lives which “are shortened by preventable adverse event each year,” he stated.

HHS’ Office of the Inspector General estimated that medical errors caused the deaths of nearly 180,000 deaths to Medicare beneficiaries each year in a November 2011 report based on 2008 data, according to Dr. Ashish K. Jha who is also a professor of Health Policy and Management at the Harvard School of Public Health.  Again that number is significantly higher than the 98,000 estimated by the IOM.  Finally a New England Journal of Medicine study of hospitals in North Carolina “showed that there had been little evidence that harm had decreased substantially over the 6-year period,” according to the testimony of Lisa McGiffert, Director of Patient Safety for Consumers Union.

Recommendations

Among the recommendations to reduce this number was better reporting of medical errors, transparency of that reporting to the public and the use of software to go through electronic medical records to uncover medical errors.  All of the witnesses provided anecdotal evidence of medical errors that lead to death, but would not be reported using existing  reporting requirements and software.

One recommendation made by Dr. James and Lisa McGiffert was the establishment of a National Patient Safety Board similar to the National Transportation Safety Board.  The National Patient Safety Board would track the many fragmented safety programs and provide a comprehensive coordinated approach to reducing the number of medical errors, said McGiffert.

Transparency and the public availability of safety data was a recommendation made by Dr. James. He stated that patients have a right to know the safety record of their physicians and facilities where they receive care such as outpatient clinics and nursing homes as well as hospitals.   Dr. Jha recommended more mining of electronic health records to obtain evidence of medical errors. He pointed out that software currently exists that uses data in medical records to identify when a medical error occurred.  Dr. Jha advocated requiring the use of these tools for automated patient safety monitoring  as a part of the meaningful use requirements predicting that it would have a dramatic effect on the reporting of the number of medical errors.

These recommendations were advocated by the witnesses because each related a story of a person  who died as a result of a medical error in a hospital that would never have been reported as a medical error under the current reporting mechanisms.  Dr. James became an advocate of patient safety after his son died due to a medical error.  Dr. James discovered the error by examining his son’s medical records and saw that another physician missed prescribing an essential medication. Dr. James’ point though was that with the current reporting requirements, the failure of one of his son’s doctors to prescribe a medication would not have been reported as a medical error, even though an examination of the medical record indicated it was.

Comments

  1. Teaching hospitals are the worst: http://scandalethics.com

Speak Your Mind

*