Refuse to Buy Subsidized Coverage? No Charity Care for You.

Some hospitals are toying with the idea of scaling back their charity programs in response to worries that providing free or discounted care to patients with low incomes and no insurance may dissuade them from purchasing government-subsidized health insurance through the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) (P.L. 111-148) Health Insurance Exchanges, according to a report by Kaiser Health News (KHN).

Charity Care Policies

While the ACA requires that hospitals make their written charity care policies widely available, it does not impose any specific requirements as to eligibility for such programs.

According to the charity care policy posted online by Southern New Hampshire Medical Center, “[A]pplicants who refuse to purchase federally-mandated health insurance when they are eligible to do so will not be awarded charity care.” The policy also cuts off charity care for those who choose not to apply for the state’s Medicaid expansion program.

Alternatives to Limiting Charity Care

While some hospitals are enacting restrictions like this one, others are choosing simply to require patients to make a contribution toward the services received, such as $100 for emergency care.

“Patients will continue to receive needed medical care regardless of their ability to make payment at the time of service,” Kim Kitson, spokeswoman for Barnes Jewish Hospital in St. Louis told KHN. The hospital provides discounts for patients with incomes up to three times the federal poverty level.

Considerations for Hospitals

In evaluating possible changes to their charity policies, hospital executives must also weigh whether patients are unwilling to pay or if they could not afford purchasing coverage even with a government subsidy. Ultimately, though, KHN reports that hospitals have a strong interest in having more insured patients, especially since the ACA cuts government payments to providers for uncompensated care.

Todd Nelson of the Healthcare Financial Management Association told KHN, “Hospitals have always encouraged patients to apply for coverage they are entitled to receive, whether commercial insurance through employer or through programs like Medicaid.”