The Affordable Care Act at age five: a look back and a look ahead

Somewhere near their first birthdays, children learn to walk. At three years of age, they might start pedaling a tricycle, and at age five, they are poised to enter kindergarten. March 23, 2015, marks the fifth anniversary of the enactment of President Obama’s signature health reform law, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) (P.L. 111-148). Has the ACA, at five years of age, made the same amount of progress as a child?

Critics argue that the ACA has failed, but proponents say that it is moving closer to achieving its goal of quality, affordable health care for all Americans. As a law that seeks to expand health insurance coverage for Americans, improve the functioning of health insurance markets, and control the efficiency and quality of health care, the ACA has “had a major positive impact, and one that will continue to bring efficiencies over time,” said Keith Fontenot, the managing director of government relations and public policy at Hooper, Lundy & Bookman, P.C.

Regardless of whether it has met its milestones, it is clear that the ACA has already made an impact. It has had significant effects on the uninsured rate, the affordability of coverage via the provision of subsidies, the use of preventive services, and the actions of large employers and insurers. Many ACA provisions have gone into effect over the last five years; however, due to design or delay, a number of significant reforms have yet to be implemented or fully realized.

This White Paper looks at the ACA’s impact on Medicare and Medicaid issues and its impact on the private insurance market. It also looks at major ACA changes facing health care providers and employers in the coming months.

Read further, “The Affordable Care Act at age five: a look back and a look ahead.”