Highlight on New York: Governor, task force plan to end AIDS by 2020

On June 29, 2014, Governor Andrew Cuomo announced an initiative with an ambitious goal: to end the AIDS epidemic in the state by the end of 2020. He appointed a task force of 63 members and charged it to develop a plan to make it happen.

The targets:

  • reducing the number of new AIDS cases per year to 750, about the same as the number of new cases of tuberculosis;
  • reducing deaths from AIDS to zero; and
  • ending discrimination against people with HIV.

The three points of Cuomo’s initiative, called “Bending the Curve,” were:

  • identifying people with undiagnosed HIV and connecting them to health care;
  • connecting those diagnosed as HIV-positive with treatment, including antiviral therapies to suppress the virus and stop the transmission of the disease; and
  • providing access to pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to individuals at high risk for AIDS to keep them HIV-negative.

 Previous progress

At the peak of the epidemic, in 1993, there were 14,000 new diagnoses in New York each year. In 2014, there were about 3,000. The number of New Yorkers living with AIDS has grown—from 112,000 in 2002 to 132,000 in 2012—because the number of AIDS-related deaths has declined. Because medication has been made available, between 44 percent and 51 percent of infected New Yorkers have suppressed the virus, meaning that it is no longer at a detectable level.

Nationally, the number of new infections per year has remained stable at about 50,000, and only about 25 to 30 percent of people with HIV have reached suppression.

Related actions taken

Routine screening for HIV and targeted screening of individuals at risk are key to detection and treatment, but it has been necessary for the state to remove legal obstacles in recent years. In 2014, the law requiring written consent to HIV testing was amended to require only verbal consent, as is standard for other laboratory tests. Some prosecutors and police departments have forsworn or limited the practice of confiscating condoms for use as evidence in criminal cases involving prostitution.

The task force believes that transgender individuals are at higher risk for AIDS, so that legal protections against discrimination and coverage of their unique health care needs are helpful in the achievement of the goal of minimizing the spread of the disease. Therefore, the state Department of Health has adopted regulations requiring Medicaid to cover the treatment of gender dysphoria, including medically necessary gender reassignment surgery. The legislature also is considering bills that would ban discrimination based on gender identification. Both Medicaid and most private insurers will cover daily medication that prevents the transmission of the virus to the partners of HIV-positive individuals.

The task force and the blueprint

The task force formed four committees, each with its own focus: care, prevention, housing and supportive services, and data. They held public listening sessions and considered some 300 recommendations submitted to them. They then formulated 44 recommendations and tied each to at least one of the three elements of the Bending the Curve initiative.

The blueprint was presented to the governor in late April, 2015. The recommendations go beyond the goal of reducing new infections to 750, with the aim of reaching zero by 2025. An essential part of the plan is continuous monitoring to identify the populations currently most affected or at greatest risk of contracting HIV, and, as well, those most affected by “systemic health, economic, and racial disparities that act as catalysts for new infections.”