PharMerica requests Supreme Court review of FCA’s first-to-file bar

PharMerica Corporation, a provider of long-term care pharmacy services, asked the Supreme Court to change its position on the “first-to-file” bar under the False Claims Act (FCA). In a petition for a writ of certiorari, the pharmacy company asked the high court to review its May 2015 ruling in Kellogg Brown & Root Services, Inc. v. U.S. ex rel. Carter (Carter), in which the court ruled that an earlier FCA suit based upon substantially the same subject matter ceases to bar related and subsequent FCA suits after the earlier suit is dismissed. PharMerica objects to the 2015 ruling because it led to the revival of a whistleblower case brought against the company by a former employee. PharMerica’s petition warns that the Supreme Court needs to review its earlier decision to prevent the “neutering of the first-to-file bar.”

Trial court

The dispute arose from the qui tam action of a pharmacist formerly employed by PharMerica. Because a similar case was pending in Wisconsin (Wisconsin case) when the whistleblower’s case was filed, a district court dismissed the case on the grounds that it was barred under 31 U.S.C. §3730(b)(5). The trial court concluded that dismissal under the first-to-file bar was appropriate because the two actions were based on substantially the same facts and conduct.

First Circuit

After the case was dismissed, the Supreme Court handed down its decision in the Carter case, changing the outlines of the FCA’s first-to-file bar. Subsequent to that decision, the Wisconsin case that barred the whistleblower action was settled and dismissed. As a result, the whistleblower filed a motion to remand, seeking to either have the appeals court supplement his complaint with additional facts or have the case remanded to allow for supplementation. The First Circuit granted the whistleblower’s request to supplement his complaint (see FCA action dismissed under first-to-file bar may get another chance on remand, Health Law Daily, December 17, 2015).

Certiorari

PharMerica objected to the First Circuit’s decision in its petition, asserting that the Carter decision and the appellate court’s holding will allow copycat lawsuits to “circumvent the plain terms of the first-to-file bar.” The pharmacy service provider argued that the whistleblower should not have been able to resurrect his case simply by keeping it on the docket until the prior case was inevitably dismissed. PharMerica asserted that review is necessary to prevent copycat relators from “bringing placeholder suits, certain in the knowledge that earlier-filed actions will one day conclude.”