Advocates say Medicaid can shelter the homeless in Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania could use Medicaid to address its homelessness problem, according to advocates that believe the state’s Medicaid program should include additional supportive housing services. Those individuals assert that additional supportive housing services can be included in Medicaid as a “wrap-around support service”—a type of service that CMS endorses and described in a Center for Medicare & CHIP Services Informational Bulletin last year.

Housing services

CMS expressly does not provide Federal Financial Participation (FFP) for room and board as part of additional support services. However, states are permitted to assist individuals through coverage of certain housing-related activities and services. Some of the housing-related services and activities that Medicaid can cover include: (1) services designed to support an individual’s ability to prepare for and transition to housing; (2) services aimed at supporting an individual’s ability to sustain tenancy; and (3) services dedicated to assisting a state in identifying and securing housing options for individuals. Specific examples of each of those services are covered in the Informational Bulletin. The Open Door is an example of an organization that provides housing support services.

Pennsylvania

In Pennsylvania, advocates like The Housing as Health Campaign are asserting that, for many Medicaid enrollees with substance abuse problems, additional support is needed to keep beneficiaries in their homes. Advocates argue that without a consistent funding stream, Medicaid beneficiaries wind up homeless. The Corporation for Supportive Housing (CSH) created a blueprint, or “Crosswalk,” to serve as a map to assist the Pennsylvania Department of Health and Human Services with aligning Medicaid-eligible services with supportive housing services.

Crosswalk

The Crosswalk was designed to guide the state of Pennsylvania, managed care entities, and service providers towards resources that can improve access to substance use treatment and mental health recovery, with a focus on housing. According to the report, individuals with unmet housing needs are often particularly vulnerable due to the high occurrence of low incomes, chronic health conditions, and behavioral health challenges among the population. The report proposes several methods to improve housing and care access for at-risk individuals. CSH started its analysis by considering the services that the state already provides through several Medicaid waivers. While Pennsylvania does have mechanisms to provide some housing support services for elderly individuals, beneficiaries with traumatic brain injuries, and individuals with a physical disability, CSH noted that additional individuals could benefit from supportive housing.

Alignment

The report identified potential opportunities for alignment, where services that are already covered under the state plan could be aligned to better address housing support service needs. For example, the report suggested that, because the Pennsylvania state Medicaid plan covers Individualized Service Plans (ISPs) for the treatment of individuals with severe mental illness, an individual could, possibly, identify housing goals as part of his or her treatment plan, thereby including housing support services through an ISP. The report lists several other types of services with potential for alignment to reduce or eliminate gaps in housing service coverage.

Rethinking Medicaid

Advocates are not directly asking for a change as to the kind of services covered by the Pennsylvania Medicaid program. Instead, the CSH report and other efforts are asserting that housing problems can be best improved through a better application of existing services under the Medicaid state plan. Advocates hope that such a rethinking of Medicaid will improve health by putting a roof over the head of more individuals.