Highlight on Iowa: Update on West Nile, Zika, and HIV diagnoses

The Iowa Department of Public Health (IDPH) recently announced the first human West Nile virus cases of 2016, that new HIV diagnoses were up 27 percent in 2015, and that 13 Iowans were infected with Zika in summer 2016.

West Nile

The IDPH announced that testing at the State Hygienic Laboratory (SHL) in Iowa has confirmed the first human cases of West Nile virus disease in 2016. A female child (0-17 years of age) and an adult male (41-60 years of age), both of Sioux County, were hospitalized due to the virus but are now recovering. “These cases serve as a reminder to all Iowans that the West Nile virus is present and it’s important for Iowans to be using insect repellent when outdoors,” according to IDPH Medical Director, Dr. Patricia Quinlisk.

Iowans are advised by the IDPH to: (1) use insect repellent with DEET, picaridin, IR3535, or oil of lemon eucalyptus (DEET should not be used on infants less than two months old and oil of lemon eucalyptus should not be used on children under three years old); (2) avoid outdoor activities at dusk and dawn; (3) wear long-sleeved shirts, pants, shoes, and socks whenever possible outdoors; and (4) eliminate standing water around the home.

Since West Nile first appeared in Iowa in 2002, it has been found in every county in Iowa, either in humans, horses, or birds. The virus peaked in 2003, when 141 were sickened and six died. In 2015, 14 cases of West Nile virus were reported to IDPH. The last death caused by West Nile virus was in 2010, and there were two deaths that year.

Zika

According to a August 12, 2016 Zika virus update from IDPH, the mosquitoes that are transmitting Zika virus in Central and South America and threatening parts of the southern United States are not established in Iowa, so the risk to Iowans occurs when they travel to Zika-affected areas. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued Level 2 travel alerts to Zika-affected areas advising travelers to take measures to prevent mosquito bites. Thirteen Iowans have been confirmed to have Zika in summer 2016, but all were believed to be infected while traveling in affected regions.

HIV

The IDPH annual HIV Surveillance Report for 2015 finds there were 124 new HIV diagnoses in 2015, an increase of 27 percent from the 98 cases reported in 2014. This increase marks a return to the levels seen in 2013, and is a reversal from the drop in cases from 2013 to 2014.

The IDPH speculates that since 2014 was the first year of full implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), it is possible that fewer HIV tests were performed because providers were dealing with the influx of new patients, leading to fewer confirmed cases. The 2015 increase may be because providers were more prepared for the increase in patients, and were more likely to perform HIV testing. This speculation is supported by the fact that the largest diagnoses decreases in 2014 and increases in 2015 occurred in private physician offices, hospital-based clinics, and community health centers (compared to public test sites, correctional settings, and blood banks).

Of the 2,367 diagnosed persons (both in and out of care) in Iowa, 76 percent were virally suppressed.  Nationally, an estimated 42 percent of persons diagnosed with HIV (both in and out of care) had attained viral suppression, so Iowa does very well by comparison.

In addition, the IDPH reports that the number of deaths among HIV-infected persons diagnosed in Iowa continues to decrease since peaking at 103 deaths in 1995. Since 2000, the number of deaths has fluctuated from a low of 20 to a high of 44.  Preliminary data indicate 20 HIV or AIDS-related Iowa deaths in 2015.

IDPH and its community partners are currently creating Iowa’s 2017-2021 Comprehensive HIV Plan, which will be released in fall 2016.