Highlight on Georgia: State focused on promoting access to care

Georgians have received several pieces of good health care access news lately as the state works ensure that young adults and those living in rural areas get the care they need. Despite constant financial concerns surrounding health care, the state seems to be making it a priority.

Rural Healthcare 180

Rural Healthcare 180 is an effort to promote the new donation program that gives tax credits to both individuals and corporations that make donations to rural hospitals. Kim Gilman, chief executive of Phoebe Worth Hospital and Southwest Georgia Regional Medical Center, said that the hospitals need to upgrade expensive equipment and provide raises to employees.

In total, 48 rural hospitals are eligible to receive the donations. Tax credits will be supplied for donations of up to $4 million, with caps starting at $50 million in 2017 and increasing by $10 million each year for the next two years until program expiration. The potential of additional funding will hopefully address the crisis, as many rural hospitals seem to be set for the same fate as the five that have closed in the past four years.

Mental health center expansion

A new Atlanta campus of a mental health facility will open in October, adding 32 beds for young adults aged 18 to 26. This Rollins Campus, named for a gift received from the O. Wayne Rollins Foundation, is Skyland Trail’s second Atlanta campus. The nonprofit treatment organization operates 48 beds, and 60 percent of patients treated are young adults. Older adults have found Skyland Trail to be a lifeline, including a 63-year-old physician who reported experiencing her first psychotic episode at 56 years of age. She spent five months at Skyland Trail, where she attended to more than her mental health and was able to lose weight through the organization’s nutritional program.

State could be an example for EpiPens® in schools

In the wake of the EpiPen pricing controversy and stories about children in schools denied access to their own pens, Georgia’s approach may offer solutions to ensure safety in situations where students might be unknowingly exposed to food allergens. Karen Harris, mother to three children with severe allergies, founded Food Allergy Kids of Atlanta (FAKA) in 2007 in order to unite families like her own. Her goal is to ensure that this “first-line treatment” is accessible to everyone with any type of allergies.

In 2013, Georgia Governor Nathan Deal (R) signed the Emergency Epinephrine Act, which was introduced by Senator Chuck Hufstetler (R-Rome) and backed by FAKA. The law encourages (but does not require, unlike some states’ legislation) schools to stock EpiPens for emergency use, and authorizes providers to write a prescription in the name of a school. The law also protects anyone who uses the medication in good faith through its good Samaritan provision. A second piece of state legislation allows professionals to prescribe EpiPens for many public entities, including churches, restaurants, and arenas, provided that they register with the state. According to Georgia Health News, only 12 non-school entities have registered, and the article points out that no discount programs are offered to these entities.

Although some are concerned about parents depending on school-stocked pens and failing to provide for their children’s needs, a Georgia school nurse was thankful that they were able to receive donated pens through Mylan’s school program. She noted that in rural settings, quick access to epinephrine is vital when hospitals are some distance away. She has trained 25 teachers to administer the medication in the event of anaphylaxis.