Federal and beneficiary spending on Medicare will skyrocket if ACA repealed

Repeal of the Affordable Care Act, as promised by the incoming Congressional leadership and President-elect Donald Trump’s (R) Administration, would not only increase Medicare spending but also lead to higher beneficiary costs, a less-solvent Part A trust fund, and the return of the Part D drug benefit “doughnut hole.” The Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) published an issue brief on the Medicare implications of repeal of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) (P.L. 111-148), finding that the Medicare provisions of the ACA have strengthened Medicare’s financial status for the future, and repeal would weaken the program.

KFF noted that the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimated an increase in Medicare spending of $802 billion from 2016 to 2025 if the ACA were repealed in full (see Repealing the Affordable Care Act—an unaffordable idea?, Health Reform WK-EDGE, June 24, 2015). This increase would primarily be attributed to higher payments to health care providers and Medicare Advantage (MA) plans, which the ACA reduced based on the expectation that due to coverage increases, hospitals would have fewer uninsured patients.

Repeal of the ACA would increase Medicare Parts A and B spending by $350 billion over 10 years. It would also increase Part A deductibles and copayments and Part B premiums and deductibles. Similarly, the ACA removed a payment per enrollee discrepancy that paid MA plans 14 percent more than traditional Medicare; in 2016, MA plans only received 2 percent higher payments than traditional plans. A repeal would increase MA spending; however, it would also potentially reduce MA enrollees’ costs or allow them to receive additional benefits.

Under the ACA, certain Medicare benefits are available with no cost-sharing, including a yearly exam and some preventive screenings. The ACA also closed the coverage gap, or doughnut hole, in the Part D drug benefit. Without these changes, beneficiary costs would increase for preventive services and drugs.

The ACA played a role in extending the solvency of the Medicare Trust Fund by establishing new dedicated sources of revenue. As a result, four years’ time was added to the Medicare trustees’ projection of asset depletion in 2014 (see Life expectancy of Medicare trust funds extended to 2030, July 30, 2014). A repeal of these revenue provisions would give the Trust Fund a shorter lifespan.

The analysis also considered repeal of the ACA’s provisions for the following:

  • Freezing income thresholds for the Part B income-related premium;
  • Creating a formal method to expand payment and delivery system reforms through the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (CMMI);
  • Reducing preventable hospital readmissions and hospital-acquired conditions; and
  • Establishing new accountable care organization (ACO) programs.

Overall, KFF determined that ACA repeal without corresponding replacement legislation would weaken Medicare’s financial status for the future while costing beneficiaries and the federal government more.