High Court won’t hear case alleging discriminatory Medicare claims denial scheme

The U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear a case alleging that HHS participated in a racially discriminatory scheme of Medicare claims denials. The Fifth Circuit dismissed Edwards v. Burwell for lack of subject matter jurisdiction and failure to state a claim due to untimely filing, failure to specify improperly denied claims, and sovereign immunity. The High Court denied certiorari without comment.

A Texas physician was subject to a Medicare review process between 1997 and 2001 that resulted in denial of most of his claims. Most of those denials were successfully overturned on appeal, but the physician claimed that he was forced to close his practice in 2001 as a result of the initial denials. He filed a lawsuit against HHS, the HHS Secretary, and other unknown agents in 2014, alleging that his claims were initially denied as a result of racial profiling.

In affirming the district court’s dismissal of the doctor’s claims, the Fifth Circuit stated that the claims were filed outside of the 60-day window for judicial review required by 42 U.S.C. § 405(g) and were barred under § 405(h), which holds that a suit against the government or its officers or employees cannot be brought for Medicare actions. Furthermore, the physician failed to specify those claims that were not reversed on appeal (see No jurisdiction for discrimination suit based on reversed claim denials, Health Law Daily, August 3, 2016). He then filed his ultimately-denied petition for certiorari.