Kusserow on Compliance: Court will not reconsider order to clear Medicare claims appeals backlog

On December 15, 2016, HHS asked the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia to reconsider its December 5 order requiring the agency to clear the Medicare appeals within four years, stating it would not be able to meet the requirements under the schedule recently ordered without “substantial new resources and authorities.”  The court rejected this argument, as it had already been presented by HHS and considered by the court in reaching its order.  Unless HHS appeals the Court’s decision in American Hospital Association v. Burwell (U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, January 4, 2017), this will conclude the 2.5 year litigation initiated by the American Hospital Association (AHA) and several hospitals.   Plaintiffs challenged the failure of HHS to meet statutory timeframes related to adjudication of Medicare claims appeals. The Court adopted the plaintiffs’ proposed timetable for clearing the backlog, requiring a 30% reduction of the current backlog of cases pending at the administrative law judge (ALJ) level by December 31, 2017, a 60% reduction by December 31, 2018, a 90% reduction by December 31, 2019, and a 100% reduction by December 31, 2020.

A failure to meet the deadlines would mean that claimants may move for default judgment in their favor. HHS is further obligated to submit a report every 90 days on its “progress in reducing the backlog and includ[ing] updated figures for the current and projected backlog, as well as a description of any significant administrative and legislative actions that will affect the backlog.” The HHS Secretary argued that the timetable would require her to “make payment on Medicare claims regardless of the merit of those claims.”  The Court responded by noting that HHS has already violated Medicare statute by not complying with statutory deadlines for Medicare appeals and the timetable provides a reasonable period for “proper claim substantiation.”  “If the Secretary fails to meet the [court ordered] deadlines, plaintiffs may move for default judgment or otherwise enforce the writ of mandamus.”

Tom Herrmann, JD, who served over twenty years as a former ALJ and executive in the Office of Counsel to the Inspector General, observed that health care providers and suppliers with pending appeals will welcome the court action requiring HHS to take steps to comply with the statutory deadlines for resolution of appeals.  He explained that governing law and regulations require an ALJ to hold a hearing and render a decision within 90 days of a party’s filing of an appeal with Office of Medicare Hearings and Appeals (OMHA).  However, they have been unable to meet this deadline, resulting in a backlog of 1 million pending appeals.  A Government Accountability Office (GAO) report last June was highly critical of the HHS appeals process and the failure to meet deadlines, and the OMHA moratorium on accepting new appeals requests in order to catch up has not worked.

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

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Copyright © 2017 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.