Recipients of cost-sharing reductions seek to intervene in House v. Burwell

Two recipients of cost-sharing reductions under section 1402 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) (P.L. 111-148), concerned that the House Republicans might alter their position after the inauguration of President-elect Donald Trump (R), sought permission to intervene in the pending appeal in House of Representatives v. Burwell.

House v. Burwell

The Department of Treasury has been reimbursing insurers for their payment of reductions under section 1402 from the permanent appropriation in the Internal Revenue Code (31 U.S.C. §1324). The U.S. House of Representatives filed suit against the Secretaries of HHS and the Treasury claiming that the payments are not authorized by section 1324. The district court entered an injunction barring the payments (see Court sides with House Republicans, finds no appropriation for cost-sharing reductions, Health Law Daily, May 18, 2016) and the Secretaries appealed. On December 5, 2016, the D.C. Circuit granted the House’s motion to hold the appeal in abeyance until February 21, 2017 (see Court puts cost-sharing appeal on hold, awaits possible Trump policy, Health Law Daily, December 7, 2016).

Possible about-face

According to the movants, their interests were aligned with those of the Executive Branch, which advocated for a construction of section 1324 that permits the continued payment of cost-sharing reductions to insurers. However, statements in the House’s motion suggest that it could change position after Trump’s inauguration and enter into an agreement to dismiss the appeal or otherwise agree that the injunction should take effect—for example, that the House and the incoming Administration are “discussing possible options for resolution” of the appeal other than to “continue prosecuting” it. To defend their interest in continued payment of the cost-sharing reimbursement, the recipients asked to intervene in the case.

Potential for harm

The motion noted that if cost-sharing reimbursement payments stop, recipients of cost-sharing reductions who purchased insurance policies for 2017 will likely face early termination of those policies because the government will allow insurers to leave the exchanges. Even if the insurer remained in the market until the end of 2017 without government reimbursement for cost-sharing reductions, it would “surely exit the marketplace at the end of the plan year in order to shed any obligation to provide cost-sharing reductions.” All of this, say the movants, would drastically increase their costs for insurance.