House Republicans narrow aim to specific provisions in health reform battle

House Republicans introduced four bills as part of a new piecemeal strategy to repeal and redefine the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) (P.L. 111-148). The proposed legislation—which will be considered at a February 2, 2017, hearing before the House Energy and Commerce Committee—concerns: (1) special enrollment period (SEP) eligibility verifications; (2) premium rate ratios; (3) grace periods for missed premium payments; and (4) a political promise to continue the ban on preexisting condition exclusions.

SEP

The first bill would require HHS verification of an individual’s eligibility for a SEP before an insurer would be permitted to make coverage effective for that individual. Although HHS has already developed a pilot program for some SEP eligibility verifications, the bill would require HHS to create a verification process, through interim final rulemaking, for plan years beginning on or after January 1, 2018.

Premium variation

The second bill would give insurers more authority to vary the premium rates charged to older enrollees, as compared to younger enrollees, in the individual and small group markets. The bill would permit insurers to raise the current ratio of three-to-one to a ratio of five-to-one, or, to any other ratio established by a state. The greater variation addresses insurer complaints that the three-to-one ratio is not actuarially appropriate.

Grace period

The third bill would reduce the length of the current 90-day grace period afforded to premium tax credit recipients who miss their premium payments. The bill would shorten the grace period to one “provided by law” or one month. Although premium tax credit recipients are, by definition, experiencing financial difficulty, the bill is designed to assuage insurers’ contentions that premium tax credit recipients are using the grace period to skip the last three months of premium payments, catching up only when or if they develop a need for health care. However, HHS noted in the preface of its Notice of Benefit and Payment Parameters for 2018 (81 FR 94058) that such grace period “gaming” claims are unsubstantiated.

Preexisting conditions

The fourth bill, which does not promise a change in policy, is a statement of policy. In essence, the bill is a promise, in the event Congress decides to repeal the ACA, that the health reform replacement will include a provision with an absolute ban on preexisting conditions clauses. The bill establishes Congress’ position that it will not allow a return to a health insurance market where coverage decisions are based upon the status of an enrollee’s health. The bill makes a curious exception, however, for genetic conditions which have not already led to a diagnosis.