OCR shows no signs of slowing HIPAA enforcement

The HHS Office for Civil Rights (OCR) is on pace to have another record-breaking year for enforcement actions against covered entities (CEs) and business associates (BAs) accused of Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) (P.L. 104-191) violations. As of February 13, 2017, it had already entered into two resolution agreements with CEs and imposed civil monetary penalties (CMPs) on another for only the third time in its history. Prior to 2016, the OCR had not entered into more than six resolution agreements with CEs or BAs in single year. As of December 2016, the OCR had entered into twice that number. As of February 13, 2016, the OCR had just imposed its second CMP, but had not yet entered into any resolution agreements.

The agency kicked off the year by entering into a $475,000 resolution agreement with Presence Health. Unlike past agreements that settled potential violations of the HIPAA Privacy and Security Rules, the Present Health resolution represented the OCR’s first agreement to resolve potential violations of the HIPAA Breach Notification Rule. Presence failed to notify the OCR, affected individuals, and the media that paper-based operating schedules containing the protected health information (PHI) of 836 individuals had gone missing in the statutorily-required 60-day timeline for breaches affecting more than 500 individuals; instead, it waited more than 100 days.

Eight days later, the OCR announced a $2.2 million resolution agreement with MAPFRE Life Insurance Company of Puerto Rico for Security Rule violations affecting the data of 2,209 individuals. The OCR determined that MAPFRE failed to perform a risk analysis, implement risk management plans, and encrypt data stored in removable storage media led to a breach caused when a thief stole a USB data storage device containing electronic PHI (ePHI).

In early February, the OCR announced that it had issued a final determination and imposed a $3.2 million CMP on Children’s Medical Center of Dallas due to a pattern of noncompliance with the Security rule. Children’s suffered a breach in 2010 due to the loss of an unencrypted, non-password-protected BlackBerry device containing the ePHI of 3,800 individuals.  It suffered a second breach in 2013; despite the first breach, Children’s had failed to encrypt a laptop containing the ePHI of 2,462 individuals that was later stolen. The agency determined that the CMP was merited based on Children’s failure to implement risk management plans, in contravention of prior recommendations to do so, and its failure to encrypt mobile devices, storage media, and workstations. The OCR also imposed CMPs against Lincare, Inc., a home health company, in 2016 and against Cignet Health in Prince George’s County, Maryland, in 2011.

The agency stepped up enforcement efforts in 2016, in part due to negative reports regarding its performance from the HHS OIG and the Government Accountability Office (GAO). It began the Phase 2 audit process, targeting both CEs and BAs, and announced its intention to allocate resources for the first time to investigate complaints of breaches affecting 500 individuals or fewer. It appears geared to continue, if not ramp up, its enforcement efforts, but the impact of newly appointed HHS Secretary Thomas E. Price, M.D.–who will appoint a new OCR director–remains to be seen. Price, a physician and former Congressional representative has historically opposed government regulatory activity of physicians. However, Adam H. Greene, Partner at Davis Wright Tremaine, suggests that, although Price the physician may dislike HIPAA, “his personal views will [not] necessarily lead to a significant change in enforcement.”