Highlight on New York: Insurers subject to first-in-nation cybersecurity regulations affecting financial institutions

The nation’s first cybersecurity regulations governing financial institutions–including insurers–take effect March 1, 2017 in New York state. Noting that  “New York is the financial capital of the world,” Governor Andrew Cuomo (D) stressed the necessity of protecting consumers and financial systems from cyberattacks. The regulations require institutions to implement a cybersecurity program that includes regular assessments of information systems and the use of effective controls, requires compliance by third party vendors, and includes more stringent governmental reporting requirements than the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) (P.L. 104-191).

The regulations apply to anyone operating under the Banking Law, Insurance Law, or Financial Services Law and specifically pertain to “nonpublic information.” Only electronic information qualifies as nonpublic information, which can be protected health information (PHI) as it is understood under HIPAA; business-related information that could materially and adversely impact the entity’s business, operations, or security; or any information concerning an individual that, when combined with specific data elements, including but not limited to Social Security and drivers’ license numbers, could identify the individual.

The regulations require covered entities to maintain a cybersecurity program based upon a required risk assessment. Risk assessments must be conducted on a “periodic” basis and “updated as reasonably necessary.” Entities must implement and maintain written cybersecurity policies, including policies governing vendor and third party service provider management and recurrent assessments and policies that allow for secure and periodic disposal of nonpublic information that is no longer necessary for business operations or other legitimate business purposes. They must also designate a chief information security officer (CISO) who is employed by the entity, an affiliate, or a third party service provider, and who will provide a written report to the covered entity’s board of directors at least annually.

While HIPAA does not require penetration testing, the New York regulations require annual testing and biannual vulnerability assessments, unless covered entities have in effect some other type of continuous monitoring or other system to detect changes in information systems that could create or suggest vulnerabilities. The regulations specifically require entities to limit user access privileges to nonpublic information and to periodically review those privileges. They also require multi-factor authentication whenever an individual accesses the entity’s internal network from an external network, unless the CISO has approved controls in writing that are at least reasonably equivalent. Encryption is required for all nonpublic information held or transmitted by the entity; if encryption is not feasible, the CISO must review and approve “alternative compensating controls” and review them at least annually.

Certain requirements do not apply to entities with fewer than 10 employees, less than $5 million in gross annual revenue in each of the last three fiscal years from New York business operations, or less than $10 million in year-end total assets.

The regulations define a “cybersecurity event” as an act or attempt, successful or not, to gain unauthorized access to, or to disrupt or misuse an information system or the information stored in the system. Written incident response plans to cybersecurity events must detail the response process and its goals, including “the definition of clear roles, responsibilities and levels of decision-making authority.” Requirements for reporting to government entities are much stricter than those under HIPAA Breach Notification Rule, which requires entities to report breaches affecting 500 or more individuals to the HHS Secretary “without unreasonable delay,” but no more than 60 days since discovery of a breach, or, if affecting fewer than 500 individuals, within 60 days of the end of the calendar year in which the breach occurred.  The New York regulations, in contrast, require entities that are otherwise required to provide notice to the government or other self-regulatory agency or supervisory body, or who believe that a cybersecurity event is reasonably likely to materially harm the entity’s normal operations, to notify the Superintendent of the New York Department of Financial Services as soon as possible, but no more than 72 hours after determining that the event occurred.