8 years of illegal kickbacks costs Hospice Plus $12M

A group of hospices owned by Curo Health Services and operating under the Hospice Plus brand agreed to pay over $12 million to resolve allegations that they paid kickbacks in exchange for patient referrals in violation of the False Claims Act (31 U.S.C. §3729). The scheme came to light after several whistleblowers filed qui tam lawsuits on behalf of the United States, consolidated as U.S. ex rel. Capshaw v. White. The United States had previously partially intervened in the lawsuit against the corporate defendants for purpose of settlement; the suit remains pending against two former Curo executives, and the United States requested permission to intervene in the remainder.

Kickbacks were allegedly paid to (1) American Physician Housecalls, a physician house call company in the form of sham loans, free equity interest in another entity, stock dividends, and free rental space; and (2) to medical providers, including doctors and nurses, in the form of cash, gift cards, and other valuable items. According to the consolidated whistleblower complaints, the house call company allegedly received kickbacks from 2007 through 2012, while providers allegedly received payments from 2007 through 2014.

The involved hospices primarily operate in and around Dallas, Texas, and were first known as Hospice Plus, Goodwin Hospice, and Phoenix Hospice. The three companies were purchased by Curo Health Services in 2010 and consolidated under the Hospice Plus brand.