Adoption of annual wellness visits increasing at a moderate rate

Trends in annual wellness visits (AMV) indicate a modest increase in the percentage of Medicare beneficiaries receiving an AWV from 7.5 percent in 2011 to 15.6 percent in 2014, according to a study of the trends related to annual wellness visits (AWV) published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) on April 19, 2017. The study found that “adoption of AWV was concentrated in ACOs [accountable care organizations] and among certain PCPs [primary care physicians] and regions of the country.”

Addition of the AMV to Medicare benefits

The AMV was added to Medicare benefits by section 4103 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) (P.L. 111-148) as part of its preventive care measures for Medicare beneficiaries. Medicare pays for 100 percent of the visit. The AWV became effective in January 1, 2011. According to the study, the AWV “has been promoted as a way for physicians and other clinicians to encourage evidence-based preventive care and mitigate health risks in aging patients.”

Study findings

Among the results of the study are the following findings: (1) white individuals, urban residents, and those from higher income areas and with one or two comorbidities were more likely to obtain an AWV; (2) beneficiaries that received an AWV in previous years were more likely to receive an AWV; (3) 44.4 percent of all AMVs had a concurrent problem-based visit; (4) most AMVs were performed by primary care physicians; and (5) physician practice groups or regions using more AWVs did not deliver more health care overall. The researchers also noted that beneficiaries reported unexpected out-of-pocket costs when AWVs are billed concurrently billed with problem-based visits.

The study conclusions

The study concluded that the decision to perform an AWV was primarily driven by practice factors and noted that this conclusion aligned with reports of physicians and health systems having incorporated templates, workflows, or dedicated nonphysician health care professionals to complete, document, and bill for AWVs. According to the researchers, the study had limitations, including: (1) whether AWVs increase the use of preventive care or mitigate health risks, (2) claims data could not show how often AWVs were performed by nonphysicians under physician supervision, and (3) the extent to which AWVs represent delivery of additional visits versus substitution for other visits..