CIAs contain lessons for compliance professionals & board members

The typical obligations contained in a corporate integrity agreement (CIA) overseen by the HHS Office of Inspector General (OIG) can be implemented by compliance programs to drive accountability and improve effectiveness. In a webinar titled Compliance Accountability: Lessons Learned from Implementing Corporate Integrity Agreements, Tom Herrmann, JD, and Carrie Kusserow, MA, CHC, CHPC, CCEP, both of Strategic Management Services, LLC, provided an overview of the standard obligations in a CIA, including recent changes, and provided tips to listeners on how to effective oversight and organizational controls for health care organizations.

CIAs are typically included as part of a “global settlement” of criminal, civil, and administrative charges against a health care provider or entity. The CIA, which usually lasts for five years, allows the provider to remain a participant in federal health care programs in exchange for compliance responsibilities. These responsibilities include oversight by the compliance officer, executive-level compliance committee, and board, but also written guidance, mandatory trainings, screening for excluded providers, and regular reports to the OIG. Recently, the OIG has made some changes to CIA obligations, including requirements for management including certifications, minutes from executive-level compliance committee meetings, and obligations for the board.

To avoid entering into a CIA, or to survive one that has already been implemented, organizations should have a compliance officer who is a member of senior management. The compliance officer should report to the CEO, and is neither responsible for serving as legal counsel, nor subordinate to general counsel or the CFO. The compliance officer should chair the executive-level compliance committee, which should include senior management from relevant departments, and meet at least quarterly. Certain senior executives, including the CEO, COO, CFO, and CMO have obligations to monitor and oversee activities within their areas of authority. Lastly, the board of directors, made up of independent, non-executive board members, should be specifically trained on corporate governance and its responsibilities for compliance program oversight.

All compliance programs should have updated written policies and procedures, a disclosure mechanism like a hotline, provide annual training, and should include compliance as an element of performance review for all employees.