FDA opens toolbox for imported food oversight

The FDA is relying on “a range of tools” to ensure the safety of imported foods, in keeping with directives under the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). Because 15 percent of the Food supply is imported, the FDA has developed “a multi-faceted toolkit” to help ensure the safety of imported food. To meet food safety oversight demands, the FDA is allocating resources based upon risk, leveraging the work of other responsible entities in the food supply chain, and combining FSMA tools with existing methods (inspections, physical examinations, sampling/testing).

Food supply

According to the FDA, about 15 percent of the U.S. food supply is imported. However, some aspects of the food supply are predominantly supplied through imports. For example, nearly 50 percent of fresh fruit, 20 percent of fresh vegetables, and 80 percent of seafood are derived from imports. Food supply imports come from more than 200 countries and around 125,000 firms.

Oversight

Dr. Donald Prater, Acting Assistant Commissioner for Food Safety Integration in the Office of Foods and Veterinary Medicine (FVM), noted that under changing oversight protocols, while the level of oversight will be comparable across the food supply chain, “the deployment of the tools may be different.” For example, he noted the requirement that importers verify their suppliers produce food consistent with U.S. food safety standards. He indicated that the goal of imported food safety oversight was not to establish the same system of oversight for domestic and imported foods, but, instead, “to ensure that foods imported from abroad are as safe as those produced domestically.”