HELP Committee hears ardent support for next round of user fee agreements

Four witnesses expressed their support of the continuation of FDA user fee agreements before the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) on April 4, 2017. These user fee agreements cover prescription drugs, biosimilar drugs, generic drugs, and medical devices (PDUFA, BDUFA, GDUFA, and MDUFA, respectively), requiring manufacturers to pay fees that fund the FDA’s approval processes. According to the witnesses, continuing to impose these fees is vital to ensuring the successful development and approval of future therapies.

Testimony

David Gaugh, a senior vice president of the Association for Accessible Medicines (AAM), emphasized the necessity of the partnership between the pharmaceutical industry and the FDA. Although there has been significant growth in the generic and biosimilar industries, he reminded the committee that the FDA is underfunded and depends on the user fees to speed up the approval process. The AAM also believes that the GDUFA program will incentivize competition by reducing the number of FDA review cycles, removing barriers to drug approval for companies and access to therapies for patients.

Scott Whitaker, president and CEO of the Advanced Medical Technology Association (AvaMed), felt the same way about MDUFA. He believes that the decline in the number of medical technology startups and venture capital investment in recent years is due to the length of time to develop devices, seek approval, and enter them into the stream of commerce. Whitaker noted the MDUFA IV agreement builds upon the provisions in the 21st Century Cures Act (Cures Act) to continually improve the efficiency of the approval process while maintaining strict standards for safety and effectiveness.

Cynthia Bens, vice president at Alliance for Aging Research, and Kay Holcombe, senior vice president at Biotechnology Innovation Organization (BIO), also expressed their support for the programs. Bens lauded Congress for allowing patient organizations to participate in the user fee negotiations, and expressed thanks to the FDA for allowing the Alliance to provide feedback throughout the negotiating process. She highlighted strengthening the FDA’s workforce, increased patient-focused drug and device development methods, and advancing clinical trials as positive outcomes from the user fees. Holcomb also stressed the necessity of integrating patient input into the decision-making process, noting that patients are best able to weigh in on the risks and benefits of treatment. Holcombe believes that the new round of user fee agreements will provide better program sustainability and financial transparency, allowing the FDA to better manage personnel, ramp up approval timelines, and develop innovative clinical trial designs.