Webinar provides multiple perspectives on FCA cases

To avoid federal False Claims Act (FCA) (31 U.S.C. §3729 et seq.) liability, providers should implement an effective compliance program, stay ahead of the government’s investigation of possible FCA violations, and fix problems first. In a Health Care Compliance Association (HCCA) webinar entitled, “False Claims Act Cases—Perspectives from Both Sides of the Aisle,” Rachel V. Rose, principal at Rachel V. Rose—Attorney at Law, PLLC, and Sean McKenna, shareholder at Greenberg Traurig LLP, provided an overview of the process for filing federal FCA complaints and how to respond to investigations and lawsuits under the FCA.

Complaints

Qui tam relators file their complaints under seal, on behalf of the government. The Department of Justice (DOJ) has 60 days to investigate and decide whether to intervene, which happens only about 10 percent of the time. Even then, the government will prosecute only the strongest aspects of the case. The presenters warned that relators should use “an abundance of caution” when discussing an FCA case or the underlying allegations with anyone other than the whistleblower’s attorney or the government agents assigned to the case, as “breaking the seal” can result in dismissal or sanctions.

False claims

The type of false claim that most frequently leads to FCA liability is a claim for services not provided. Other categories of false claims include legally false claims (express), legally false claims by implied certification, and reverse false claims. In United Health Services, Inc. v. United States ex rel. Escobar, (2016), the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the implied certification theory and relied on whether the claim was material to payment, what McKenna called a “groundbreaking approach” (see Implied certification liability confirmed, limited to material compliance violations, Health Law Daily, June 16, 2016).

Since November 2, 2015, the range of penalties for violating the FCA increased from $5,500-$11,000 to $10,781-$21,562, plus treble damages and the relator’s attorney fees. FCA violations can also lead to exclusion, “the death penalty for health care providers.” Exclusion applies only to conduct from the past 10 years (42 C.F.R. Sec. 1001.901(c); see HHS OIG’s exclusion authority loosens, allows more discretion, Health Law Daily, January 12, 2017).

In parallel proceedings, simultaneous civil/criminal/administrative investigation of the same defendants occurs. It can be federal and state/local or multi-district. Not every case is appropriate for parallel proceedings, however. Examples of common parallel matters include procurement and government program fraud, health care fraud, internet pharmacies, and antitrust investigations.

Yates memo

The past several years in health care fraud and abuse prosecutions have seen an increased focus on individual actors such as executives, as reflected in a September 9, 2015 memo from former acting attorney general Sally Yates, known as the “Yates Memo.” The Memo emphasized the DOJ’s commitment to combat fraud “by individuals” and recommended that: (1) to qualify for a cooperation credit, a corporation must provide facts relating to the individuals responsible for the misconduct; (2) investigations should focus on individuals from the inception of the investigation; (3) culpable individuals should not be released from liability absent extraordinary circumstances; and (4) DOJ attorneys should not resolve matters with a corporation without a clear plan to resolve related individual case.

Best practices

If an FCA investigation occurs, providers should evaluate all liability (civil, criminal, administrative, state, licensure, and private), determine if anyone needs separate counsel or has talked to the government, preserve documents, and compile the right team, including consultants, billing and coding experts, and statisticians.

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