Anthem, Cigna call off merger, maybe mooting pending SCOTUS petition

After the Delaware Court of Chancery denied Anthem, Inc.’s motion for a preliminary injunction that would have prevented Cigna Corporation from terminating a merger agreement entered into between the two insurance giants two years ago but beset by legal challenges—including a lawsuit by the United States on antitrust grounds—Anthem finally agreed to terminate the agreement. Cigna, which stopped defending the agreement during the trial, which resulted in a holding that the agreement would harm the public (see Swan song for Anthem’s acquisition of Cigna?, Health Law Daily, February 9, 2017), reiterated its belief that Anthem breached its obligations under the agreement and therefore owes it a $1.85 billion reverse termination fee. Anthem believes that Cigna was first in breach, and is not entitled to the fee. The dueling announcements came one week after Anthem filed a petition for writ of certiorari in the Supreme Court, seeking review of the Circuit Court’s affirmation of the District Court’s decision (see Injunction barring Anthem’s acquisition of Cigna upheld, Health Law Daily, May 1, 2017).

A brief history of recent failed mergers. In 2015, proposed mergers were announced between four of the five largest health insurance companies in the United States. In addition to Anthem’s proposed acquisition of Cigna, Aetna Inc. attempted to purchase Humana Inc., and the subject quickly came under scrutiny (see To merge or not to merge, that was the question before a Senate subcommittee, Health Law Daily, September 24, 2015). While the companies indicated that the proposed acquisitions were in response to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) (P.L. 111-148), concerns about the resultant impact on the Medicare Advantage (MA) program were raised, in addition to concerns about stifling competition and slowing innovations. In July 2016, the Department of Justice (DOJ) filed lawsuits to prevent the two transactions, and the idea that Anthem and Cigna were not necessarily on the same page about the acquisition came to light as Cigna appeared less-than-enthusiastic about fighting the DOJ (see DOJ lawsuit steps in between Aetna-Humana and Anthem-Cigna mergers, Health Law Daily, July 21, 2016). Humana and Aetna terminated their pending merger agreement after the D.C. District Court halted that transaction (see Tale of two mergers: Cigna-Anthem goes South; Humana, Aetna drop plans, Health Law Daily, February 15, 2017; Aetna, Humana plan separate futures after dissolving merger plans, Health Law Daily, February 14, 2017; Aetna’s $47 billion purchase of Humana enjoined, Health Law Daily, January 23, 2017).

Anthem’s fights continue. Although Anthem agreed to terminate the merger with Cigna, the legal battle between the two companies will likely continue. In addition to the imminent fight over the reverse termination fee, Anthem’s writ for certiorari remains pending before the Court (No. 16-1342). The petition presented the question whether a 1967 Supreme Court antitrust decision “forecloses consideration of efficiencies in merger analysis,” and, if not, “whether and how a court must weigh [efficiencies] as part of a determination of net competitive effect.” According to the petition, there is a circuit split on the issue. The petition, however, may be determined moot because there is no longer an active case or controversy; it is unlikely that the Court will take up the question because the issue is capable of repetition, and not evading review.

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