Archives for June 2017

Kusserow on Compliance: OIG proposed budget for 2018 cites accomplishments

The HHS OIG submitted their fiscal year (FY) 2018 proposed budget for a total of $359 million that includes $291 million to support oversight of the Medicare and Medicaid programs.  In justifying their request, the OIG reported expected recoveries of more than $5.66 billion for FY 2016 that includes $4.46 billion in investigative receivables and approximately $82 million in CMPs. The OIG’s work also prevents fraud and abuse through industry outreach and guidance and recommendations to HHS to remedy program vulnerabilities. Additionally, OIG reported on its role as a Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control (HCFAC) program participant in returning $5 to the Medicare Trust Funds for every $1 invested in FY 2016. The OIG reported 844 criminal actions against individuals or organizations that engaged in crimes against HHS programs and 708 civil and administrative enforcement actions, including False Claims Act lawsuits filed in Federal district court, and Civil Monetary Penalty (CMP) law settlements. The OIG excluded 3,635 individuals and organizations from participation in Federal health care programs. The OIG is also part of Health Care Fraud Strike Force teams that coordinate operations conducted jointly by Federal, State, and local law enforcement entities that resulted in filing of charges against 255 individuals or entities, 207 criminal actions, and $321 million in investigative receivables.

Over the last five years, the OIG’s expected recoveries have averaged $5.3 billion annually. Changes in the amount of expected recoveries from year to year are due to the particular mix of cases resolved in a given year, as well as continued efforts to work with operating divisions to implement OIG recommendations.

 

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

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Copyright © 2017 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.

Applying lessons learned when conducting FCA investigations after Escobar

The Supreme Court opinion in Universal Health Services v. U.S. ex rel Escobar established that the implied certification theory may be a basis for False Claims Act (FCA) (31 U.S.C. §3729) liability if allegations satisfy both the FCA’s materiality and scienter (knowledge) requirements, Joan W. Feldman, partner at Shipman & Goodwin LLP explained during a Health Care Compliance Association webinar on June 26, 2017. She noted that the focus in FCA cases going forward will be whether the government would have refused to pay the allegedly false claim if it had known of the information allegedly omitted or misrepresented.

The Supreme Court’s opinion and remand

The Supreme Court granted certiorari in Escobar to answer whether the implied certification theory was viable and if it could only apply when a provider violated a legal requirement that the government explicitly designated as a condition of payment. Although the Court determined that implied certification is a valid theory, it stated that the FCA should not be considered a vehicle for “punishing garden-variety breaches of contract or regulatory violations…” The Court further concluded that “a misrepresentation about legal compliance does not become material simply because the Government labeled the legal requirement as a ‘condition of payment,’ but whether the defendant knowingly violated a requirement the defendant knows is material to the Government’s payment decision.” The Court remanded the case to the First Circuit (see Implied certification liability confirmed, limited to material compliance violations, Health Law Daily, June 16, 2016).

Feldman pointed out that upon remand, the First Circuit identified three factors that had to be considered when evaluating materiality and knowledge: (1) was compliance a condition of payment, (2) was compliance with a specific regulation the essence of the agreement; and (3) did the government pay the claim even though it was aware of the issue?

The First Circuit concluded, if Medicaid’s decision to reimburse Universal Health Service would have been unaffected by knowledge of the regulatory violations, the violations would not be material, and the implied false certification lawsuit could not proceed. In this case, however, the complaint stated that regulatory compliance was a condition of payment, licensing and supervision requirements were central to the regulation of mental health treatment facilities generally, and the factual allegations were limited to reimbursement claims filed during treatment (see Implied false certification lawsuit under the FCA stated a valid cause of action, Health Law Daily, November 29, 2016).

Lessons from Escobar

The Escobar case illustrates that the FCA is nuanced and complex, Feldman said. She noted that courts will closely scrutinize and evaluate materiality on a fact specific, case-by-case basis to determine whether the alleged violations are sufficient to constitute a false claim. Although she said it is not clear how the Supreme Court’s opinion will play out in the courts, she stressed the importance of claimants clearly stating their materiality and knowledge claims under the implied certification theory. She also emphasized the importance of reacting appropriately and promptly to FCA complaints or concerns.

Investigations

Feldman provided the details of several steps in conducting an FCA investigation, including where to start, maintaining attorney client-privilege, working with the government, planning and conducting an investigation, and mitigating the risk of a FCA qui tam action. She emphasized the importance of maintaining confidentiality throughout the investigation. In addition, she

  • Where to start. When confronted with a false claim allegation, providers must respond promptly. The date and time that the allegation was made must be documented and the allegation must be communicated to leadership. Legal counsel experienced with false claims should be engaged and the Medicare administrative contractor or Medicaid agency must be notified. The compliance officer must assign responsibility for the investigation but must limit the number of individuals in the sphere of knowledge and communication. Accountability and follow-up are essential as well as the preservation of documents.
  • Maintaining attorney client privilege. Consult with counsel to protect the attorney-client privilege. Ensure document production is done with counsel who creates a privilege log for documents that will not be turned over to the government. Interview witnesses separately to protect communications.
  • Working with the government. When working with the government compliance officers must be cooperative, responsive, and timely; yet maintain an advocate position for the organization. They must understand the issue, facts, and relevant law as well as the settlement if there is one. Feldman encouraged compliance officers not to be intimated by the government or assume its position is correct. She explained that the government only knows the case from the qui tam relator. She told compliance officers to “push back” and advocate the organization’s position with facts and laws when presented with the government’s case.
  • Planning the investigation. An investigative plan must be developed, a timeline created, and records of the investigation must be maintained, including the process, interview notes, and witness log. Witnesses must be identified and interviews must be scheduled.
  • Conducting the investigation. The attorney should conduct the investigation and may have deputized staff to assist. When a complaint of subpoena is received, litigation hold must be communicated throughout the organization. Documents are reviewed and interviews conducted. When appropriate, engage auditors or experts. Leadership should be kept informed throughout the process.

Additional tips

Other advice Feldman provided included circling back to complainant, avoiding whistleblower retaliation, and being mindful of the collateral effect of an investigation on employees. In addition, she emphasized that concerns raised by an individual must be taken seriously. Compliance officers should give them full attention and document the concern and how it was addressed. If the individual is not satisfied with the findings, the compliance officer should document why no further action will be taken and notify counsel. If attention is not given when a concern is raised, the individual may pursue an action.

Repeal of ACA pre-existing condition rules could leave millions of newly insured without coverage

The Republicans’ proposals to replace the pre-existing condition rules (sections 1101, 1331, 1341, and 1501) of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) (P.L. 111-148) with states’ high-risk pools for individuals who would be denied insurance coverage or charged higher rates in the individual insurance market “will be insufficient to maintain the health care access gains made since 2010,” according to an Issue Brief (Brief) published by The Commonwealth Fund. The Brief, which compared coverage and access gains for people with pre-existing conditions after passage of the ACA with state high-risk-pool enrollment prior to the ACA, concluded “[i]f the ACA’s pre-existing conditions rules are repealed, millions of Americans could find it difficult to obtain affordable health care.”

Pre-existing conditions defined

The definition of pre-existing conditions includes a range described narrowly and broadly, the Brief explained. “The narrow definition includes very costly health conditions” that could result in the denial of coverage for individuals prior to the ACA provision, while “the broad definition includes sight less expensive chronic health conditions” that, without the ACA provisions, could result in unaffordable health insurance costs for most individuals with pre-existing conditions.

Key findings

A prior study conducted by The Commonwealth Fund concluded that there had been significant improvements in people with pre-existing conditions to purchase health insurance coverage on their own in 2016 relative to 2010. In this Brief, The Commonwealth Fund determined that people with pre-existing conditions gained coverage and had increased access to care and found that improvement of access to care was greatest in states where coverage gains were the greatest. The data indicated that 16.5 million more people were insured in 2015 than from 2011 – 2013. The newly insured population included 16 percent of individuals that fell into the narrow definition and 57 percent that fell into the broad definition.

High-risk pools

The Brief examined the relationship between the increase in insurance coverage and access to care among individuals with pre-exiting conditions and prior enrollment in pre-existing condition insurance plans (PCIPs) and high-risk pool programs. According to the Brief, “there was no relationship between enrollment in the PCIP or the share of the nongroup market enrolled in high-risk pools and gains in coverage or access post-2014.”

House Committee urged to extend funding for federal safety net programs

Extend funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) to ensure continuity of coverage for children, particularly in light of the current uncertainty surrounding other sources of health coverage in the U.S., witnesses urged at a House Committee on Energy and Commerce hearing titled “Examining the Extension of Safety Net Health Programs.” The purpose of the hearing was to examine the extension of funding for two federal safety net health programs that provide health care and coverage for low-income adults and children, CHIP and the Community Health Center Fund (CHCF).

CHIP

CHIP is a program that provides health coverage to targeted low-income children and pregnant women in families that have annual income above Medicaid eligibility levels but have no health insurance. It is jointly financed by the federal government and states, and the states are responsible for administering the program. A memo from the committee majority staff states that in fiscal year (FY) 2015, 8.4 million children received CHIP-funded coverage.

Section 2101 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) (P.L. 111-148) increased the CHIP enhanced federal medical assistance percentage (E-FMAP), which varies by state, by 23 percent from October 1, 2013 through September 30, 2019. Since the ACA did not include additional or extended funding for CHIP, MACRA extended funding through September 30, 2017. The Medicaid and CHIP Express Lane Option, Child Enrollment Contingency Fund, CHIP Qualifying State Option, and CHIP Outreach and Enrollment Grants also expire September 30, 2017.

At the hearing, Cindy Mann, partner at Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, touted the success of CHIP, which covers 8.9 million children nationwide. She stated that Congress must consider the overall level of funding for CHIP, in addition to the E-FMAP funds, which “are now fully integrated into states’ budgets and a key source of funding for sustaining CHIP.” She said that Congressional action is needed as soon as possible to ensure program continuity, budget certainty for states, and stable coverage for children, particularly those with special health care needs. She urged a five-year extension instead of two to provide needed stability (see Extend CHIP, protect DSH payments, MACPAC tells Congress, March 16, 2017).

Jami Snyder, Director of the Medicaid and CHIP programs for the state of Texas, noted that a decision to not reauthorize the CHIP program would result in a loss of over $1 billion in annual funding to the state of Texas and a loss of coverage for more than 380,000 Texas children.

Health Center Program

The Health Resources and Services Administration’s (HRSA) Health Center Program, authorized under Section 330 of the Public Health Service Act, awards grants to federally qualified health centers (FQHCs). The program is supported by discretionary appropriations and the CHCF, a mandatory multibillion-dollar fund established by Section 10503 of the ACA. The Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA) (P.L. 114-10) extended funding through fiscal year 2017. According to the staff memo, the CHCF represents over 70 percent of the Health Center Program’s FY 2016 funding.

Michael Holmes, the chief executive officer of Cook Area Health Services, an FQHC in Minnesota, testified that as a result of CHCF investments new FQHC were added in more than 1,100 communities. With the extension nearing its expiration date, he “strongly urged” Congress to renew funding for at least five years to allow FQHCs to provide a stable and reliable source of access to patients and recruit and retain a comprehensive health care workforce.