Kusserow on Compliance: Summary of OIG fraud and abuse actions first half of 2017

The HHS OIG issued their Semi-Annual report for first half of fiscal year (FY) 2017 and summarized key accomplishments, significant problems, abuses, deficiencies, and investigative outcomes relating to the administration of HHS programs and operations that were disclosed during the reporting period. The following summarizes reported statistical accomplishments.

Criminal Actions (468). OIG reported 468 criminal actions against individuals or entities that engaged in crimes against HHS programs and 461 civil actions, which include false claims and unjust-enrichment lawsuits filed in Federal district court, civil monetary penalties (CMP) settlements, and administrative recoveries related to provider self-disclosure matters.  During the first half of FY 2017, OIG reported expected investigative recoveries of over $2.04 billion.

Health Care Strike Force (152 Criminal Actions). The Health Care Fraud Strike Force teams brought charges against 45 individuals or entities, 152 criminal actions, and $267 million in recoveries through investigations.

State Medicaid Fraud Control Units (MFCUs) (1,564 Criminal Actions).  The OIG has oversight responsibility for MFCUs and administers grants that provide federal funding for their operations. There are 50 MFCUs (in 49 States and the District of Columbia) totaled almost $259 million. The MFCUs employed 1,965 individuals. MFCUs reported 18,730 investigations, of which 15,509 were related to Medicaid fraud and 3,221 were related to patient abuse and neglect, including misappropriation of patients’ private funds. The cases resulted in criminal charges or indictments involving 1,721 individuals, including 1,249 for fraud and 472 for patient abuse and neglect. In total, 1,564 convictions were reported in FY 2016, of which 1,160 were related to Medicaid fraud and 404 were related to patient abuse and neglect. Civil judgments and settlements for FY 2016 totaled 998, and monetary recoveries in civil cases totaled over $1.5 billion. During this reporting period, OIG special agents partnered with MFCUs in conducting joint investigations on 714 criminal cases.

Program Exclusions (1,422). During this semiannual reporting period, OIG excluded 1,422 individuals and entities from Medicare, Medicaid, and other federal health care programs. Most of the exclusions resulted from convictions for crimes relating to Medicare or Medicaid, for patient abuse or neglect, or as a result of license revocation. OIG is also responsible for reinstating providers who apply and have met the requirements of their exclusions.

Sanction Authorities and Other Administrative Actions (1,504).  OIG sanctions include the exclusion of individuals and entities from federal health care programs and the imposition of CMPs for submitting false and fraudulent claims to a federal health care program or for violating the Anti-kickback statute, the Stark law, or the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act (EMTALA), also known as the patient dumping statute. During this semiannual reporting period, OIG imposed 1,504 administrative sanctions in the form of program exclusions or administrative actions for alleged fraud or abuse or other activities that posed a risk to federal health care programs and their beneficiaries.

Civil Monetary Penalties Law (CMPL) ($26 million0. The CMPL authorizes OIG to impose administrative penalties on and assessments against a person who, among other things, submits, or causes to be submitted, claims to a federal health care program that the person knows, or should know, are false or fraudulent. In addition to administrative penalties and assessments, OIG can also exclude individuals for engaging in conduct prohibited by the CMPL. During this semiannual reporting period, OIG concluded cases involving more than $26.3 million in CMPs and assessments.

Self-Disclosure Programs ($23 million). Health care providers, suppliers, or other individuals or entities subject to CMPs can apply for acceptance into the Provider Self-Disclosure Protocol, a program created in 1998, to voluntarily disclose self-discovered evidence of potential fraud. During this semiannual reporting period, self-disclosure cases resulted in more than $23 million in HHS receivables.

 

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on Google+ or LinkedIn.

Subscribe to the Kusserow on Compliance Newsletter

Copyright © 2017 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.