Webinar gives tips on improving next eCQM submissions

Health care compliance professionals who are involved in electronic clinical quality measures (eCQM) submissions should prepare now for their 2017 submissions, according to Catherine Gorman Klug RN, MSN, Director, Quality Service Line, for Nuance Communications. In a Health Care Compliance Association (HCCA) webinar titled, “eCQM Lessons Learned and How to Prepare for 2017 Submissions,” Klug warned attendees about hidden dangers, including the lack of experience for eCQM vendors, inaccurate data submissions, and the challenges posed by multiple types of electronic health record (EHR) data files generated from more than one system. She also gave recommendations for reducing risk and listed sample questions for the information technology (IT) department.

CMS requires hospitals to report eight of 15 eCQMs, with data reported for the entire year. According to Klug, the agency expects “one file, per patient, per quarter,” that includes all episodes for care and measures associated with the patient. Many hospitals use vendors to assist with the eCQM submissions, but Klug noted that vendors must have an adequate amount of time to respond to required changes before submission, and that although many vendors support a broad number of eCQMs, they may lack adequate depth of coverage. Hospitals should choose vendors who are experienced in the eCQMs they are reporting. Further, there is no way to validate the files submitted. Possible consequences include an annual payment update reduction, failure to receive the EHR incentive payment, or poor quality scores on CMS’ Hospital Compare site.

To reduce risks, hospitals should ask the core measures vendor to validate files before submission to CMS. They should also review file error reports from the vendor and make corrections before the data is submitted. Aggregated file error reports should also be reviewed to ensure that formatting or data elements don’t result in an inaccurate submission. Klug said that accurate coding is absolutely essential. Therefore, hospital IT departments should be prepared to explain how files are validated prior to submission to ensure accuracy, and if not, what the remediation strategy is. Further, compliance professionals should request a file error report, and any other reports to help understand the data being submitted.