Hospital compliance programs need to integrate explanted device policy

Medicare requires that explanted medical devices—implantable devices that are removed due to recall, advisory, malfunction, failure, or early battery depletion—must be pursued by the provider as for free replacement or reduced charges under warranty. The failure to do so results in an overpayment for the provider or hospital, which must then be repaid to CMS. In a Health Care Compliance Association (HCCA) webinar, Jesse Schafer, Explant Control Manager, Mayo Clinic, and Peter Casady, CEO and Co-Founder, Champion Healthcare Technologies discussed best practices for medical device warranty credit failures and related HHS Office of Inspector General (OIG) audits.

Since 2010, the OIG has conducted six audits specifically for credit failures on medical device warranties, and found overpayments ranging between $30,000 and $300,000. In these cases, the warranty credit failures occurred because the hospitals:

  • did not pursue available credits;
  • did not report credits received;
  • did not have adequate internal control procedures to coordinate functions among various departments; or
  • relied upon the vendor to manage the device return and credit process (and gaps resulted).

Schafer recommended a workflow among various departments, including compliance, coding, clinical, pathology, supply chain / contracting logistics, accounts receivable, and patient financial services. Hospitals should (1) identify explanted devices that are eligible for warranty credits due to performance issues; (2) secure eligible explanted devices; (3) make sure the devices were returned to the vendor for warranty claims; (4) follow up on warranty claims to confirm approval; (5) make sure the provider then received credit or a no-charge replacement; and (6) adjust claims for credits that are greater or equal to 50 percent.

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