Senate urged not to proceed with BCRA by civil and human rights groups

One hundred sixty six civil and human rights organizations including The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, the National Health Law Program, and the National Partnership for Women & Families are urging senators to oppose the motion to proceed on the Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA) (H. R. 1628). The organizations sent a letter to senators on July 24, 2017, expressing their concern that the BCRA will “eliminate affordable quality health care for millions of Americans.” Specifically, the organizations said that the BCRA would gut the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) (P.L. 111-148) and slash federal funding as well as transform Medicaid [funding] into a block grant or per capita cap; and eliminate Medicaid expansion (see ACA sec. 2001 and sec. 1201 of the Health Care Education and Reconciliation Act of 2010 (HCERA) (P.L. 111-152). In addition, the organizations pressed senators to support the Parliamentarian’s ruling excluding the defunding of Planned Parenthood from the bill.

The Senate’s lack of transparency

The organizations noted that they were “seriously concerned about the lack of transparency of the discussions’ that lead up to the introduction of the BCRA and “the rush to vote on the bill without adequate time for analysis, hearings, and a discussion of a CBO [Congressional Budget Office] score.” The organizations stressed that such discussions, would allow the public to better understand the proposed legislation and participate in a discussion of their access to health care.

The impact of the BCRA

The organizations identified the issues that arise from the BCRA provisions that the organizations believe would have a serious impact on the communities that they represent including low-income families and people of color. These issues include:

  • The 15 million people that would lose their Medicaid coverage by 2026 under the revised version of the BCRA, as estimated by the CBO.
  • The repeal of Medicaid expansion, which will disproportionately affect the communities including Latinos, African Americans, Native Americans, Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders who have seen the largest gains in coverage under the ACA, and women.
  • The proposed cuts that could vastly reduce access to needed health care, reduction in needed services, increased medical debt, and persistent racial disparities in mortality rates.
  • The possible reduction in home and community-based services, which are cost-effective and keep individuals out of nursing homes and institutions.
  • The imposition of a work requirement as a condition of eligibility, which fails to further purpose of providing health care and undermines the objective.
  • The defunding of Planned Parenthood that would prevent more than half of its patients from getting affordable preventive care, including birth control, testing and treatment for sexually transmitted diseases, breast and cervical cancer screenings, and well-women exams.

Vanita Gupta, president and chief operating officer of The Leadership Conference noted that the letter reflects the widespread concerns of people, especially people of color, women, and low-income families, who currently “receive life-saving coverage because of the Affordable Care Act and the expanded Medicaid coverage” but will lose their access to quality affordable health care and will have higher health care costs “if the Republicans succeed.”