Continuous improvement in compliance can proceed systematically

Provider organizations should not dread continuous improvement in compliance and can apply several techniques to simple problems to bring about simple solutions. In a Health Care Compliance Association (HCCA) webinar entitled “Continuous Improvement in Compliance,” presenter Alan Wileman, Corporate Compliance Manager at Shriners Hospitals for Children, discussed applying principles from Lean and Six Sigma to improve function and eliminate waste in company functioning.

Improvement methodologies

Wileman noted that compliance goals evolve, and that the OIG uses subjective terms for compliance matters such as “reasonable,” “appropriate,” and “meaningful.” What is meaningful or reasonable for one compliance area may not be sufficient for another area or at a later date. Overall, lowering risk is the focus of many compliance tasks, but there may be better ways to bring about that desired result.

Improvement methodologies such as Lean, Six Sigma, and project management have been proven to streamline procedures, eliminate waste, and bring value. Lean ideas and practices originally derived from industrial manufacturing, and have one main purpose: eliminating waste. Six Sigma is often grouped with Lean concepts, and focuses on eliminating error waste by removing variation in procedures. According to Six Sigma, there may be multiple ways to do the same thing, but there is always a best way to do so that reduces variation. Project management focuses on clearly defined terms, roles, and goals in order to successfully complete a project—a non-routine operation with a definite beginning, end, and goal.

Waste

According to Wileman, there are several types of waste. Among those discussed included talent, inventory, waiting, defects, and motion. Compliance departments should ensure that a particular task is being completed by the employee whose strengths play to that area. Motion waste comes from requiring employees to move around the work area too much in unnecessary ways, when communication could effectively be conducted in a non-face-to-face manner or when a workplace could be reorganized to provide a better workflow.

Toolkit

Reorganization also applies to employees’ personal workspaces, which should be uncluttered and only contain the necessary, crucial supplies. Wileman suggests adding the “5S” strategy to an operation’s compliance toolkit. The five elements are: sort, set in order, shine, standardize, and sustain. These elements ensure that a workspace is stocked as necessary, arranged to promote efficiency, neat, organized consistently with other spaces, and sustained in this manner. For tasks, the “DMAIC” acronym is made up of the elements define, measure, analyze, improve, and control. Once a problem is clearly defined, it is easier to map out the process, identify the cause of the problem, implement the solution, and maintain the solution over time.

Speak Your Mind

*