IT experts say foreign actors, human error biggest threats to health record security

Foreign hackers and human error are two of the most significant threats to protected health information (PHI) and other health records that providers and health care entities must prepare for, according to four information technology experts speaking at a conference sponsored by Becker’s Hospital Review. They all agreed that breaches and cyberattacks will continue, so health care institutions must be diligent about security systems, audits, training, insurance, and adequately responding to breaches to mitigate punishment and quickly recovery from an attack..

Weakest link 

Aaron Miri, chief information officer for Imprivita, and Michael Leonard, director at Commvault, both noted that regardless of the tools and systems put in place to ward off breaches, malware, ransomware, and other cybersecurity threats, people will always be the weakest link. Leonard noted that when it comes to an institution’s cybersecurity program, “people training has to be continuous and repetitive.”

Katherine Downing, senior director at the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA), highlighted one type of “insider threat”—physicians who do work arounds that bypass the security features of electronic health record (EHR) systems (like texting PHI about patients to each other). Although David Miller, CEO of HCCIO Consulting, LLC, was blunter when asked what the biggest threat was to PHI and other health records—”Russia and China.”

Jurisdictions

Miri noted that providers must deal with a “wide disparity of laws” regarding the security and privacy of health information, not just federal and state laws, but, starting in May 2018, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) issued by the European Union. The GDPR replaces a framework of different information security measures that mainly affected just European companies with a national network and information security strategy that will impact American life sciences and healthcare entities that collect and/or use any data concerning health, genetic data, or other types of protected health information (PHI).

Audits

Miller expressed amazement at how many health care institutions have not had a HIPAA audit in the previous two years. The HHS Office for Civil Rights (OCR) reviews organizations’ compliance with the HIPAA Privacy, Security, and Breach Notification Rules and looks for documentary proof that entities have conducted risk assessments and created and implemented policies and procedures governing areas including the shielding of PHI. Miller noted that providers must continually educate and re-educate staff on policies related to HIPAA. But he added that providers can also “take advantage of a breach situation to talk to senior management to increase security measures.”

Record retention

In addition to protecting PHI, health care entities have to make decisions about destroying records after record retention periods have ended. Katherine Downing, senior director at the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA), noted that entities “can’t keep everything forever.” Downing noted that health care entities already have the expense of saving, backing up, and securing required health records; doing the same for older records that no longer have to be retained is just an added expense.

In the end, Miri noted that these are the questions that health care entities have to ask: What are they willing to spend to avoid a breach? What are they willing to risk regarding their reputations?