Kusserow on Compliance: Oncology remains high federal enforcement priority

Oncology continues to be a high enforcement priority for the DOJ, OIG, FBI, and CMS.  The latest fraud investigation by the DOJ involves CCS Oncology, large and prominent providers of cancer care. The reported question being investigated relates to possible billing irregularities involving Medicare and Medicaid. As with most cases related to oncology irregularities, the predication was by a “whistleblower.” The complaint alleges CCS billed for more expensive procedures than were actually performed, billed for procedures that never were performed, and performed medically unnecessary procedures on patients, among other violations, according to the source. The stream of cases is long enough to outline key factors that have led to settlements with the DOJ and OIG. Compliance Officers, whose portfolio of responsibilities include oncology services may wish to review the following to ensure none of these factors are at work in a manner that may trigger investigation.

Common Oncology Enforcement Issues

  1. Employees knowingly submitted false records to Medicare and Medicaid to increase revenue
  2. Claims submitted for services performed without required physician supervision
  3. Offering unnecessary treatments and services to patients
  4. Recruitment and treatment of terminal patients that should have been referred to hospice care
  5. Re-treatment of patients in excess of prescribed dosage limits
  6. Claims for services when physician reviews had not taken place
  7. Claims where treatment occurred without prior required IGRT scan
  8. Physicians allowed registered nurses to fill out prescriptions for medications
  9. Offering inducements (“kickbacks”) to patients by waiving their co-pays
  10. Conducting not necessary fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) tests for bladder cancer
  11. Filing payment claims for GAMMA functions by improperly trained physicians and staff
  12. Seeking payments for tests whose results doctors had not reviewed
  13. Billing E&M services on the same day as a related procedure
  14. Double and over-billing Medicare for services that lacked supporting documentation
  15. Improperly billing for radiation treatment without proper physician supervision
  16. Submitting false claims for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) services
  17. Billing for services that were not documented in the patients’ medical records
  18. Billing twice for the same services
  19. Misrepresentation of the level of a service provided to increase reimbursement
  20. Routinely waived patient copayments as an inducement, then billing Medicare for them.
  21. Claims for services not performed, medically necessary, and/or properly documented
  22. Claims for services rendered to patients referred by physicians benefiting from referral
  23. Purchasing cancer treatments from unlicensed sources for oncology practice
  24. Diluting patients’ chemotherapy treatments and delivering in a manner designed to extend period of treatment time
  25. Claims for medically unnecessary or properly documented intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)
  26. Unsupported add-on claims for “special treatment procedures” and “specialty physics consults”
  27. Violating the Stark Laws and Anti-Kickback statute by rewarding referring physicians