Medicaid and CHIP are catching uncovered kids, the ACA helps

Due to high rates of Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) coverage for young children, only 3.3 percent of children ages three and younger were uninsured in 2016. Coverage of both young children (age three and younger) and their parents increased under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) (P.L. 111-148) in 2014 and 2015—a trend that continued in 2016. According to an Urban Institute report, young children and their families continued to rely on Medicaid and CHIP in 2016, with 48.5 percent of young children covered by Medicaid or CHIP. In comparison, only 42 percent of older children were covered by the programs.

Trends. Nearly half of young children and one-fifth of the parents of young children were covered by Medicaid and CHIP in 2015 as well. The high incidence of Medicaid and CHIP coverage is partly due to higher incidence of family characteristics among parents of younger children, including lower incomes, younger parents, and mixed immigration status.

Variance. Despite high overall levels of coverage, the prevalence of health insurance coverage for young children and their families continued to vary across state lines. Uninsurance rates were below 2 percent in 12 states but above 8 percent in three states—Alaska, Wyoming, and North Dakota. Additionally, the expansion of state Medicaid programs under the ACA continues to be a significant source of variation in state uninsurance levels for the parents of young children. For example, an estimated 8.7 percent of parents of young children in expansion states were uninsured in 2016, whereas 18 percent of parents of young children were uninsured in nonexpansion states.