No relief; EMTALA doesn’t cover medical malpractice claims

A U.S. District Court in Alabama has dismissed a claim brought by a patient against the Health Care Authority of the City of Huntsville (the Hospital). The patient, a woman who came to the emergency room, alleged the hospital violated EMTALA by failing to conduct an appropriate screening exam and stabilize her after her admission to the hospital. The hospital moved to dismiss the lawsuit claiming they screened her appropriately and stabilized her after she arrived. The court held that the hospital met EMTALA requirements and granted motion to dismiss under Federal Rules of Civil Procedure 12(b)(6) (Baker v Health Care Authority of the City of Huntsville, July 9, 2019, Kallon, A.).

The court looked to the EMTALA requirements to determine whether the patient stated a claim for which relief could be granted. The court noted that congress enacted EMTALA to prevent hospitals from turning away or transferring indigent patients without evaluation or treatment. The court noted that to prevail on the patients EMTALA claim she must plead facts showing that the hospital violated the appropriate medical screening or stabilization requirements.

Screening requirement

EMTALA requires that when a person goes to the emergency room for an exam or treatment, the hospital must provide for an appropriate medical screening exam. The screening must be within the capability of the emergency room to determine whether or not an emergency medical condition exists. It also requires that indigent patients receive similar care to anyone else that would be screened in the emergency room with similar symptoms.

Under the facts of this case, the woman was given four screenings within an hour of arrival in the emergency room. She was diagnosed with a hypertensive emergency and admitted to the hospital. Several hours later she was examined again and properly diagnosed with a stroke. The woman argues that because she was not diagnosed with a stroke earlier, the hospital did not conduct a proper screening. The woman did not allege any facts to show that she was screened differently from any other patient. The court held that as long as the hospital screened her similarly to any other patient with the same symptoms there is no liability under EMTALA.

Stabilization requirement

Under EMTALA the stabilization requirement has to do with transferring the patient to another facility. The statute requires that the hospital treat the emergency condition as necessary to assure with reasonable medical probability that no material deterioration of the condition occurs during transfer of the patient. The court found that the EMTALA obligation to stabilize ends when the patient is admitted to the hospital and not transferred. In this case the woman was admitted to the Huntsville Hospital and therefore the woman would have had to plead facts to show that the hospital admitted her with intention to subterfuge to avoid EMTALA liability. Since she did not allege any facts to support that allegation the court holds that she has not alleged a plausible claim for violations of EMTALA’s stabilization requirement.

Holding

The court found that the woman’s allegations against the hospital for failure to provide her with timely and necessary treatment may support a malpractice claim but do not fall under a violation of the EMTALA statute. The woman would have had to show that the hospital treated her differently than other patients who presented with similar symptoms. The claim was dismissed under Rule 12(b)(6) and the court declined to exercise supplemental jurisdiction over her state law claims.