Medicaid third-party liability changes a challenge for states

The U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) conducted a study to see the progress states have made in implementing the changes in third-party liability requirements since the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018 was passed. The GAO found that the states are unclear on how to collect the required information, update their data systems, and implement the new policies. Adding to the difficulties in understanding and implementing the changes, CMS has issued inconsistent guidance and offers only outdated policy manuals that offer no assistance in implementing the changes (GAO Report, GAO-19-601, August 9, 2019).

Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018

Federal law requires states ensure that Medicaid is the payer of last resort by taking steps to identify Medicaid beneficiaries’ other potential sources of health coverage and their legal liability. The Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018 modified the required processes states must follow when paying claims with probable third-party liability for three types of services. Under the amended statute, states must apply cost avoidance procedures to claims for prenatal care services and pregnancy-related services when it is apparent that a third party is or may be liable at the time the claim is filed. Additionally, states are no longer required to pay claims for pediatric preventative services immediately and may instead require the provider to submit the claim to the third party and wait 90 days (wait-and-see period) for payment before seeking Medicaid payment. Finally, states must make payment for a child support enforcement (CSE) beneficiary’s claim if the third party has not paid the provider’s claim within a 100-day wait-and-see period.

State concerns

According to state officials, several changes to administrative tasks and the Medicaid Management Information System (MMIS) needed to be undertaken to implement the new third-party liability changes and some required research and discussion about the best methods to make these changes. Officials noted that they would need to identify the correct codes in their data systems, establish some sort of indicators in their system to identify which claims were for CSE beneficiaries or had been billed to a third party and when. Some of this additional information would require a data sharing agreement with the state entity maintaining the CSE information while other information would require providers to track down insurance information from a non-custodial parent. Some officials expressed concern that the system changes may require new hardware and system modifications and may make it difficult or impossible to implement the changes, while others discussed waiting for the new MMIS that they were already working to roll out in the future. There were also concerns that the technology changes and the increased administrative work may make the changes not cost-effective to implement.

Stakeholder concerns

Stakeholders were concerned that obtaining accurate information on third-party liability sources for Medicaid beneficiaries and resubmitting claims that result from incorrect or outdated information can be resource intensive and time consuming. Medicaid beneficiaries may be unaware or may not disclose other insurance policies, especially when there are multiple policies by custodial and non-custodial parents or transitions in insurance following birth. Some stakeholders were concerned that rural-based providers may not have the resources to deal with the increased administrative work and delays in payment for services that could result from the payment changes. This may lead some providers to be less willing to serve Medicaid beneficiaries, which would potentially reduce access to care or delay time-sensitive services for children and pregnant women. Some providers may also seek to identify sources of third-party liability before providing services to beneficiaries, which would also delay access to care.

Recommendations

Many states expressed the need for further guidance from CMS on how to implement some of these changes, however, the GAO noted that CMS has issued guidance that is inconsistent with the federal laws and some CMS guidance documents are out of date and not a reliable source of information for states to use in implementing the new requirements. Therefore, the GAO recommended that CMS ensure the agency’s Medicaid third-party liability guidance is consistent with federal law.

The GAO found that CMS has not taken steps to determine the extent to which state Medicaid agencies are meeting the new requirements and indicated that they expect states to comply and will not verify unless the agency is made aware of non-compliance. The GAO recommended that CMS determine the extent to which state programs are meeting federal third-party liability requirements and take actions to ensure compliance where appropriate.