Highlight on Pennsylvania: Better Medicaid spending through technology

Pennsylvania lawmakers introduced legislation attempting to reduce spending and improve patient care within the state’s Medicaid program. Under the proposed legislation, Senate Bill 600, the state would adopt new technology to monitor and identify areas of unnecessary or wasteful health care services and procedures. The state would have 90 days within enactment of the bill to pick a technology company and implement the monitoring. Lawmakers noted that by providing more information, patients and providers, alike, could make better health care decisions. Consequently, this would reduce Medicaid spending. Pennsylvania is one of the highest spenders per Medicaid enrollee in the U.S., with one out of every four dollars in the state’s annual budget accounted for by Medicaid.

The lawmakers have started to review tech companies with prior experience in collecting and monitoring patients to improve care, notably companies that have worked with Alaska’s Medicaid program. The tech company involved  reduced misdiagnosis rates, improved outpatient care, cut waste, and reduced Medicaid expenditures in Alaska by over 14 percent. According to Pennsylvania lawmakers, a similar program could generate between $2 billion and $4 billion in annual savings.

In fiscal year 2015-16, the federal government spent about $15.3 billion on Medicaid in Pennsylvania, while the state spent about $10.6 billion, bringing the total to $25.9 billion; the state’s Department of Health and Human Services budget over the past few years has increased by about $500 million annually. The influx of approximately 700,000 new patients into the Medicaid system is a 20 percent increase and has cost an additional $4.6 billion. State lawmakers are concerned that the push for health care reform by the federal government will result in a cut in the federal portion of Medicaid to the state.

 

Highlight on Minnesota: Health plans’ red ink worst in a decade

Nonprofit insurers in Minnesota reported an operating loss of $687 million on nearly $25.9 billion in revenue for 2016, according to a trade group for insurers, the Minnesota Council of Health Plans. The financial results were the worst in a decade, with losses in both the state public health insurance programs and the marketplace where individuals purchase coverage for themselves.

Overall, revenue from premiums increased 4 percent over the prior year, while expenses increased 6 percent to $26.6 billion. State public programs accounted for more than half of the overall losses, followed by continued losses in the individual market. According to the report, on average, health insurers paid $763 per second for care. To pay those bills, insurers withdrew nearly $560 million from state-mandated medical reserves. The bulk of the financial losses reported did not result from the employer group and Medicare markets, which remained steady, and where most Minnesotans get health insurance.

In the individual market, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota said it lost $142 million for 2016, compared to a $265 million deficit the previous year. The decline mirrored the drop in enrollment, the insurer noted, rather than an improvement in the business. Over the last 10 years, health insurers returned a profit in seven. The numbers reported by the trade group focused solely on revenue and income from the health insurance business, as investment returns made by insurers were not counted in the numbers. Some saw hope in the overall numbers, however, noting that the market was not in a “death spiral,” as some health law critics have argued, because many insurers in 2016 saw slight improvements from the previous year.

Insurance antitrust exemption reform clears House

The House passed on March 22, 2017, H.R. 372, The Competitive Health Insurance Reform Act of 2017, with a bipartisan vote of 416 to 7. The Act repeals in part the McCarran-Ferguson Act antitrust exemption for insurers, including price fixing, bid rigging, and market allocation, and retains the exemption for certain collaborative activities. A CBO report projected that the Act would have no significant net effect on the premiums that private insurers would charge for health or dental insurance and that any effect on federal revenue would be negligible.

The report noted that health insurance premiums could be lower to the extent that enacting the bill would prevent insurers from engaging in practices currently exempted from antitrust law. On the other hand, insurers could become subject to additional litigation and thus their costs and premiums might increase. The CBO estimated that both of those effects would be small.

The American Hospital Association had expressed concerns about the abuse of market power by large commercial insurers with the Departments of Justice and Health and Human Services previously.

Gatekeeping vital to a best practice organization

Gatekeeping should be viewed as a first line of defense, protecting not only a healthcare organization, but the patients as well. In a Health Care Compliance Association (HCCA) webinar titled “Gatekeeping & Monitoring – Developing Sound Processes for Screening, Removal & Reinstatement,” Amy Andersen, Director of Operations at Verisys Corp., noted that every organization can be sorted to a risk aversion spectrum. On one end, the most risk-averse organizations use best practice compliance to achieve stellar outcomes. On the other end, non-compliant organizations risk fines and loss of reputations. The greatest cost to organizations in terms of monetary impact to establish gatekeeping measures is the change management and system implementation. Regardless, best practices organizations need to be proactive about gatekeeping and monitoring, not after the fact.

Gatekeepers

The best way to protect organizations is to implement a gatekeeping strategy. Gatekeeping is ensuring that information is properly disseminated among an organization and its association. Thus, the first consideration for an organization is which parties are being let into the organization. Organizations should not only focus on the healthcare professionals within their organizations, but the vendors and contractors employed by the organization. Andersen noted that the vendor space was one of the most overlooked areas in protecting an organization.

Secondly, once an organization permits vendors or individuals into the organization, it must readily identify any gaps. In essence, Andersen said that the organization should understand what it knows and does not know about the admitted vendor or individual.

Finally, the organization should establish criteria for admittance of these vendors or individuals. Thus, an organization’s gatekeeping strategy should include three parts: (1) identification, (2) communication, and (3) remediation.

Identification, communication, and remediation

At a most basic level, identification starts with screening and monitoring. Some barriers to gatekeeping include data “hoarders,” those entities who do not share what they know or require you to go through a gate itself. These entities can be threats to the organization.

Andersen advised that organizations should examine and avoid unconsidered risks. In terms of credentialing, Andersen stressed “verify, verify, verify.” These risks are created when an organization silos information within itself. She cautioned against this, noting that organizations should do holistic reviews to determine whether the departments within the organization are communicating any risks effectively.

Access to information is vital. Once identification generates data for the organization, relevant information must be made visible. After policy and procedure access occurs, the organization must take action in a consistent manner. This is includes removal of individuals from the organization or vendor from a business relationship, expectations should be laid out clearly. Any auditing that is done should be unbiased and adhere to industry standards.