Two-year commitment needed for CSR stability

At least two years of continuous funding for cost-sharing reduction (CSR) benefits is necessary to stabilize and strengthen the individual health insurance marketplace, according to a coalition of health care and health insurance providers. In a letter to the chair and ranking member of the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions, a group including America’s Health Insurance Plans, the American Hospital Association, the American Academy of Family Physicians, the American Medical Association, BlueCross BlueShield Association, the American Benefits Council, and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce requested a firm commitment to CSR payments.

Under Section 1402 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) (P.L. 111-148), many individuals enrolling in qualified health plans through the marketplace are eligible for reduced cost sharing based on income. These reductions are guaranteed by the ACA; the federal government is supposed to make CSR payments to insurers offering plans in the marketplace to cover the reduced prices paid by plan enrollees, but the law does not guarantee those payments. The Trump Administration has not yet committed to continuing to make the payments.

In the letter, the providers and insurers explained that nearly 60 percent of enrollees in qualified health plans have CSR benefits, but noted their concern about uncertainty about CSR payment funding. They requested two full years’ funding for the CSR program, and warned that without that certainty, premiums will increase and fewer insurers will participate in the marketplace.

Timing key for internal audits, self-disclosure

There is an art to conducting internal compliance audits and determining when to begin a self-disclosure protocol—the ideal compliance program should promote prevention, detection, and resolution of any conduct that fails to comply with the requirements of state and federal health care programs. Knowing when to perform an internal investigation or audit to encourage a healthy program is key, according to Leia C. Olsen, shareholder, Hall Render, who was presenting at a Health Care Compliance Association (HCCA) webinar.

Olsen noted that many qui tam actions arise when employees do not feel as though their concerns are being heard and taken seriously. She stressed the importance of having a mechanism for reporting incidents, and timely monitoring identified issues and implementing remedial measures. However, she noted that qui tam suits can potentially be prevented not only by conducting an internal investigation, but also by self-disclosing, which can trigger the public disclosure bar. Self-disclosure of identified wrongdoing is encouraged by the Department of Justice and HHS, but, per the Yates memorandum, all relevant facts must be provided by a company before it can receive credit for cooperating and voluntary self-disclosure. Therefore, it is important to conduct a thorough investigation, collecting all available information and documentation, before self-disclosing.

The 60-day refund rule, promulgated under Sec. 6402 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) (P.L. 111-148), together with the Fraud Enforcement and Recovery Act of 2009 (FERA) (P.L. 111-21), creates False Claims Act (FCA) liability for providers who fail to report and return identified overpayments within 60 days of identifying the overpayment. Therefore, Olsen said, the time to meet the reasonable diligence standard after learning of a potential overpayment is limited. Having a protocol in place to quickly decide whether to self-disclose is critical in securing the greatest amount of cooperation credit.

All Medicare stakeholders need to know MACRA

Although the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA) (P.L. 114-10) is best known for changing Medicare provider payments, its true goal is improving the quality of care delivery across the health spectrum. As a result, according to Todd Gower and Lisa Alfieri from the Risk Transformation, Health compliance sector of EY, providers must enhance their relationships and contracts with providers. Gower and Alfieri, speaking at a Health Care Compliance Association (HCCA) webinar titled “MACRA: Not just for Providers,” explained that having the proper infrastructure to obtain and organize all necessary documentation is the key to surviving MACRA.

Gower and Alfieri stressed the need for new discussions within health systems, noting that MACRA has potential to transform the health care system “equally, if not far more” than the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) (P.L. 111-148). As it implements MACRA, HHS is having new conversations with stakeholders including whether the shared risk will actually improve care, and whether the current proposed criteria (see Halfway through QPP ‘transition year,’ CMS proposes substantial changes , June 21, 2017) are too restrictive. They praised HHS’ website on the Quality Payment Program as a new way to communicate with providers and other stakeholders.

MACRA is a complex law with wide-reaching repercussions. Gower and Alfieri suggested infrastructure updates, and predicted that the most-advanced providers will be seeking commercial payer partners by 2019 to maximize incentives for value-based care (VBC) payment models. Therefore, payers should create or enhance existing VBC offerings now to meet that expected need. MACRA steering committees are important to ensure compliance and update risk management programs for providers, but also for non-provider groups.

Wrap-around Medicaid gives states administrative headaches

Medicaid premium assistance, where Medicaid acts as wrap-around coverage for a private health insurance plan, is administratively complex for states and may not work well. In an issue brief, the Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) considered what is known about wrap-around Medicaid coverage, and looked at financial implications of such a program.

Wrap arounds

According to KFF, states with Medicaid premium assistance programs use Medicaid funds to purchase private coverage for Medicaid beneficiaries. Federal law requires these programs to make the purchased private coverage on par with what the state’s Medicaid program would cover, but private insurance generally covers less than Medicaid and requires more out-of-pocket payments. Therefore, states with these programs must provide supplemental benefits and cost-sharing protections, known as “wrap arounds,” to insure that cost sharing does not exceed Medicaid limits. In general, states with these programs have low enrollment rates, and therefore, there is limited data available to determine how well the programs work.

Administrative complexity

States have found that Medicaid premium assistance programs require a lot of administrative work to determine exemptions, track and manage cost sharing under multiple private plans, and track wrapped covered benefits. The administrative burden led multiple states to discontinue Medicaid premium assistance programs and to merely use their own managed care delivery systems. However, that burden can be minimized. When Arkansas created its Medicaid premium assistance program under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) (P.L. 111-148), it contracted with a limited number of standardized plans. The standardization made it easier for the state to track and manage the wrap-around payments.

Financing

KFF looked at legislative proposals that would expand wrap-around Medicaid coverage and noted that, in order for such a program to be effective, it would need adequate federal funding, because such programs are required to be cost effective compared with traditional Medicaid coverage. It also noted that, if these programs were done under a waiver program rather than through traditional Medicaid, the funding would be limited in duration and amount, leaving it uncertain whether the program would be able to continue in the future.