Kusserow on Compliance: Compliance officers cite HIPAA as their highest priority

The 2019 Compliance Benchmark Survey respondents reported that compliance officers are finding dealing with data breaches as their highest-ranked priority, with two-thirds of respondents citing HIPAA Security/Cyber-security and over half for HIPAA Privacy as their number one concern. This represented the biggest change since last year’s survey. Coupled with this finding was that nearly 75 percent of respondents reported the compliance office has assumed responsibility for HIPAA Privacy and nearly one-third assumed responsibility for HIPAA Security. So far this year, OCR has reportedly received upwards of a quarter million HIPAA privacy complaints.

The Survey did not focus on privacy laws and regulations emerging on the state level, nor did it provide much understanding on how organizations and compliance offices were responding to the challenges. As such, a separate 2019 survey has been designed to gather that information along with a variety of other issues.  It is designed to provide a general understanding of levels and nature of current commitment to this area.  Those who wish to participate in the 2019 HIPAA Compliance Survey can do so by clicking on the following hyperlink.

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

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Copyright © 2019 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.

Kusserow on Compliance: Even the FBI has been a victim of cyber-attacks

The FBI confirmed that least three of its websites were hacked

Records of thousands of officers and federal agents stolen

Hackers have put the data up for free download.

As health care entities struggle to guard their data against cyber-attacks, the seriousness of the need was underscored by the fact that even the FBI has trouble protecting its systems. A group of hackers has exploited the flaws of at least three FBI-affiliated websites and leaked thousands of federal and law enforcement agents’ personal details, according to TechCrunch. The hackers infiltrated multiple websites run by the FBI National Academy Association that promote law enforcement training. The sites also support graduates of the FBI Academy through local chapters.  Three of the sites were breached and the “personal information has been obtained to be sold on the web.”

The hackers announced they were able to break into the pages and download the contents, which they then uploaded on their own website. In all, they were able to steal around 4,000 unique details. Those include member names, job titles, email addresses (some personal, some government-owned), physical addresses, as well as phone numbers. The hackers also said they have over a million pieces of information on federal agents and are planning to publish more data from hacked government websites in the future. Seeing as this is far from the first security breach to affect federal workers, the government and organizations linked to its agencies may want to think of more ways to beef up their security measures.

 

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on Google+ or LinkedIn.

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Copyright © 2019 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.

Kusserow on Compliance: Most organizations reported encounters with government authorities

• Most organizations have made disclosures for HIPAA breaches and overpayments
• One third received demand letters
• Other encounters report were with OIG and DOJ

It is widely recognized that regulatory and legal enforcement activities have been increasing over the last few years. The results should be a warning bell to all compliance officers that regulators and enforcement officials are right around the corner, necessitating increased efforts on ongoing monitoring and auditing to mitigate exposure of compliance-related risk areas. In the soon to be released national healthcare “2019 Compliance Benchmark Survey” most respondents reported having encountered issues with government agencies in last five years. Ranking at the top, with nearly two-thirds of the respondents, was disclosure to the HHS Office for Civil Rights (OCR) for breaches of privacy under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). Over half reported making self-disclosures of overpayments received and addressing audits or investigations by government agencies. One-third reported responding to a demand letter from a government agency or contractor. Serious legal encounters with the government was reported at a much lower level.  One out of five respondents reported self-disclosure to the DOJ, OIG and CMS.  About one out of eight respondents reported their organization being involved in the settlement process with DOJ, self-disclosing to the OIG engagement of sanctioned individuals/entities, and being involved in a settlement process for a corporate integrity agreement (CIA).

The “2019 Compliance Benchmark Survey” report will be available without charge at the upcoming HCCA conference in Boston at Strategic Management Services, Booth 420. 

 

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on Google+ or LinkedIn.

Subscribe to the Kusserow on Compliance Newsletter

Copyright © 2019 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.

Kusserow on Compliance: OCR releases new guidelines on software vulnerabilities and patching

The HHS Office for Civil Rights (OCR) recently released a report focuses on software bugs and patches designed to reduce the vulnerability of computer systems that put electronic personal health information (ePHI) at risk. The OCR noted that last year researchers discovered a widespread vulnerability in computer processors that were sold over the previous decade. These vulnerabilities, known as Spectre and Meltdown, allow “malware” to bypass data access controls and potentially access sensitive data. This security flaw has been present in nearly all processors produced in the last 10 years and affects millions of devices. Upon discovery of these defects, vendors scrambled to release patches that addressed this problem. Managing patches plays an important role in maintaining HIPAA Security Rule compliance and without them vulnerabilities will not be fixed. The health care sector relies on software to manage ePHI and organizations are required under the HIPAA Security Rule to use appropriate technical safeguards to ensure the security of ePHI, including the evaluation of software vulnerabilities, the assessment of potential risks, and the implementation of solutions to keep risk at a reasonable minimum. The OCR suggested the following for effective patch management:

  • Evaluate patches to determine if they apply to your software/systems.
  • Test patches on an isolated system for any unwanted side effects.
  • Once patches have been evaluated and tested, approve them for
  • Deploy patch installation on live systems.
  • Test and verify to ensure correct patch installation and no unforeseen side effects

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on Google+ or LinkedIn.

Subscribe to the Kusserow on Compliance Newsletter

Copyright © 2018 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.