Kusserow on Compliance: Is there no limit to fraud cases?

Doctor convicted in connection to a $325 million fraud case

Falsely diagnosing patients with lifelong illnesses

Needlessly subjected patients to unnecessary medications

A Texas rheumatologist was convicted in a jury trial in connection with a $325 million healthcare fraud case. He was found guilty of falsely diagnosing patients with lifelong illnesses and needlessly subjecting them to unnecessary medications such as chemotherapy drugs and then falsely billing insurers for millions of dollars. The DOJ saw this as an extremely egregious case because the doctor falsely diagnosed vulnerable patients—the young, elderly and disabled—with life-long diseases requiring invasive treatments that those patients did not in fact need.

The DOJ further noted that many of the patients, including one as young as 13, suffered physical and emotional harm as a result of the chemotherapy injections, hours’ long intravenous infusions, and other excessive, repetitive and profit-driven medical procedures. Also noted was that the evidence presented at trial showed that to obstruct and mislead a federal grand jury investigation, the doctor falsified medical records.

 

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on LinkedIn.

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Copyright © 202o Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.

Kusserow on Compliance: Not all data breaches are from accidents or cyber attacks

1,182 Beaumont Health patient records compromised

Employee passed patient information to a personal injury law firm

Undetected for 3 years

Not found by hospital but from an alert by the Attorney Grievance Commission

OCR not notified because it was not a data breach

An employee for Beaumont Health, an eight-hospital health system in Michigan, was caught siphoning sensitive patient information without permission then handing it over to a personal injury attorney. The medical records involved 1,182 individuals. The identity of the law firm was not identified and it is not clear how the law firm used the information. The case is under investigation and all persons whose records were compromised are being notified.

The Michigan Health & Hospital Association was notified to alert other hospitals about the incident and guard against similar intrusions. The breach was discovered on December 10, 2019, and resulted in an internal investigation. The matter was not discovered by Beaumont, but as result of an alert by the Michigan Attorney Grievance Commission—a watchdog to maintain ethical law practices in the state. How the Commission learned of the issue was not reported.

It was determined that from February 1, 2017, until October 22, 2019, the employee accessed and disclosed protected health information (PHI) without authorization. The information accessed included names, addresses, dates of birth, phone number, email addresses, reason for treatment, insurance information, and Social Security numbers. Notified individuals have been advised on how to further protect their information and monitor financial accounts for fraud. They also were asked to closely review health insurance claim information. Those having Social Security numbers exposed have been given information about enrolling in free credit monitoring, Beaumont said.  Beaumont reported that they have no experienced or reported a data hack or unauthorized patient data loss to the Office of Civil Rights that tracks and investigates breaches of patient data.

 

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on LinkedIn.

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Copyright © 202o Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.

Kusserow on Compliance: Tips for an effective compliance exit interview program

– Useful only if done correctly

Carrie Kusserow has developed and evaluated many compliance-related exit interview programs and has found that one that is properly designed and constructed may give early warning of a potential liability and permit corrective action to prevent escalation of the problem. There is the added benefit that the program may deter departing employees from becoming “whistleblowers” after they have secured new employment and are free of the fear of retribution or retaliation. By affording these employees an opportunity to provide information prior to departure permits the individual a legitimate path for redress of grievance and reduces the likelihood they will turn outside the company to “blow their whistle.”

She found the most cost effective, efficient, and useful programs are those that separate the last day HR exiting process of filling out forms, turning in company property, providing COBRA and other needed information. On the last day, departing employees are often preoccupied with the process of leaving and what is required and may be reluctant to reveal the full and true reasons for leaving. Exit interview should be conducted as far in advance of the last day as possible. They should be a live exchange and not just “fill out the form” process and those conducting the interviews should be properly trained and with the skills to obtain useful information.

If done properly, exit interviews allow departing employees to describe experiences and identify issues for management that could otherwise remain unknown. Most such interviews will likely only take 15 to 30 minutes. The biggest challenge is defining those that the compliance officer should debrief. There is only a limited number that can be done. Generally, the individuals are limited to members of management and those identified as potentially having a grievance against the organization.  She offered the following tips for those considering establishing or enhancing their exit interview program.

 

  1. Create a policy document as to what level of management should be debriefed by the compliance officer. It is important to carefully define covered persons to avoid individuals resisting being interviewed. It should be considered just another formality in the exiting process. It then can be presented as yet another formality that must be followed before exiting the organization.

 

  1. Interviews should be scheduled as soon as possible after the decision to the leave the organization has been made. This permits the organization to take remedial action to any problems raised during the interview before the person leaves.

 

  1. Conduct the interview away from the person’s office to avoid distractions or interruptions in a place where the conversation can be overheard.

 

  1. Use open-ended questions, where the departing employee supplies the answer, are much more effective than having answers given from a predetermined list. Departing employees are typically reluctant to say or do anything that might prejudice their opportunities for future employment. The reliability and usefulness of the results is strongly affected by the skill of the interviewer and whether the employee trusts the interviewer.

 

  1. Include questions about the departing employee’s experience, especially where it involves compliance matters, discrimination, and harassment, etc. The debriefing should include very pointed questions about their work place experience with regards to compliance.

 

  1. Questions should include whether they observed any violations of laws, regulations, Code of Conduct, policies, etc. If so, the compliance office should be alerted.

 

  1. Any management, regulatory, or legal issue raised should be addressed, if possible, before the employee leaves the control of the organization. Taking corrective action while the person is still an employee may forestall that person from taking the same issues with an attorney, government agency, media, etc.

 

For more information or assistance in establishing Compliance Program Exit Interview Programs, contact ckusserow@strategicm.com.

 

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on LinkedIn.

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Copyright © 2020 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.

Kusserow on Compliance: OIG program exclusions reported for second half of 2019

Total of 2640 new exclusions added to the LEIE in 2019

Under the Social Security Act, the HHS Office of Inspector General (OIG) is able to exclude individuals and entities from participation in Medicare, Medicaid, and other Federal health care programs. Exclusions are required (mandatory exclusion) for individuals and entities convicted of the following types of criminal offenses: (1) Medicare or Medicaid fraud; (2) patient abuse or neglect; (3) felonies for other health care fraud; and (4) felonies for illegal manufacture, distribution, prescription, or dispensing of controlled substances. The OIG is also authorized (permissive exclusion) to exclude individuals and entities on several other grounds, including misdemeanors for other health care fraud (other than Medicare or Medicaid); suspension or revocation of a license to provide health care for reasons bearing on professional competence, professional performance or financial integrity; provision of unnecessary or substandard services; submission of false or fraudulent claims to a federal health care program; or engaging in unlawful kickback arrangements. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) added another basis for imposing a permissive exclusion, that is, knowingly making, or causing to be made, any false statements or omissions in any application, bid, or contract to participate as a provider in a federal health care program, including managed care programs under Medicare and Medicaid, as well as Medicare’s prescription drug program.

During this semiannual reporting period, the OIG excluded 1,347 individuals and entities from Medicare, Medicaid, and other federal health care programs. Most of the exclusions resulted from convictions for crimes relating to Medicare or Medicaid, patient abuse or neglect, financial misconduct, controlled substances, or as a result of license revocation. The OIG completed the deployment of a new service for State Medicaid Fraud Control Units (MFCUs) to report convictions through a central web-based portal for exclusion. This improved reporting from those agencies. A list of excluded individuals and entities can be found at https://exclusions.oig.hhs.gov/.

 

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on LinkedIn.

Subscribe to the Kusserow on Compliance Newsletter

Copyright © 2020 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.