Kusserow on Compliance: OIG Work Plan update on Hospital Sector

The HHS Office of Inspector General (OIG) Work Plan sets forth various audits and evaluations that are underway or planned during the fiscal year and beyond. Since June 2017, the OIG modifies the plan monthly to add new items and remove completed ones. When developing its plans, the OIG assesses relative risks in HHS programs and operations to identify those areas most in need of attention. The OIG recently reported updates to its planned work in the hospital sector that include:

  1. Determining whether: (1) skilled nursing facility (SNF) level of care was certified by a physician or a physician extender; (2) a condition treated at the SNF was one which the beneficiary received inpatient hospital services or a condition that arose while receiving care in a SNF; (3) daily skilled care was required; (4) services delivered were reasonable and necessary for the treatment of a beneficiary’s illness or injury; (5) improper Medicare payments were made on claims reviewed; and (6) hospital admissions were potentially avoidable.

 

  1. Reports on a data brief that describes nursing staffing levels reported by facilities to the Payroll‐Based Journal; examination of CMS’s efforts to ensure data accuracy and improve resident quality of care.

 

  1. Determining whether CMS corrected the common working file (CWF) edits and ensured they are working Prior review found that CMS CWF edits related to transfers to home health care, SNFs, and non‐IPPS hospitals were not working properly.

 

  1. Review of overstated Medicare charges on outpatient claims that contain both an outlier payment and a reported medical device credit to determine whether Medicare payments for replaced medical devices and their respective outlier payments were made in accordance with Medicare requirements.

 

  1. Determine how inpatient hospital billing has changed over time and describe how inpatient billing varied among hospitals and will use results to target certain hospitals or codes for a medical review to determine the extent to which the hospitals billed incorrect codes.

 

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on LinkedIn.

Subscribe to the Kusserow on Compliance Newsletter

Copyright © 2019 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.

Kusserow on Compliance: New OIG Work Plan items

The HHS Office of Inspector General (OIG) recently issued updates to its Active Work Plan (Work Plan). The Work Plan outlines ongoing and planned audits and evaluations for the fiscal year and beyond. Recent additions related to Medicare/Medicaid include the following:

  1. Medicare Part D Rebates Related to Drugs Dispensed by 340B Pharmacies. Drug manufacturers often do not pay for Medicare Part D prescription rebates filled at 340B-covered entities and contract pharmacies because the manufacturer already provides a discount on the drug. The OIG will conduct a study to determine the potential rebate savings if Part B program sponsors and manufacturers could agree on eligible prescriptions filled at 340B pharmacies that receive rebates.

 

  1. Characteristics of Part D Beneficiaries at Serious Risk of Opioid Misuse or Overdose. An OIG data brief found that about 71,000 Medicare Part D beneficiaries were at serious risk of opioid misuse or overdose in 2017. The OIG will study: (1) the characteristics of these beneficiaries, including their demographics and diagnoses; (2) the opioid utilization of these beneficiaries; and (3) the extent to which these beneficiaries have had adverse health effects related to opioids and any overdose incidents.

 

  1. Ensuring Dual-Eligible Beneficiaries’ Access to Drugs Under Part D: Mandatory Review.

Part D plans that meet certain limitations have the discretion to include different Part D drugs and drug utilization tools in their formularies. Under the Affordable Care Act, the OIG conducts an annual study to review the extent to which Part D sponsors’ formularies include drugs commonly used by Medicaid and Medicare Part D beneficiaries.

 

  1. Nursing Facility Staffing: Reported Levels and CMS Oversight. CMS uses the Payroll Based Journal auditable daily staffing data to analyze staffing patterns and populate the staffing component of the Nursing Home Compare website. It aids the public determine the results of health and safety inspections, quality of care at nursing facilities, and staffing. The OIG will issue two reports to: (1) describe nursing staffing levels that facilities report to the Payroll-Based Journal; and (2) examine CMS efforts to ensure data accuracy and improve resident quality of care.

 

  1. Medicare Part B Payments for Podiatry and Ancillary Services. Medicare Part B covers podiatry services for medically necessary treatment of foot injuries, diseases, or other medical conditions affecting the foot, ankle, or lower leg. It does not cover routine foot-care services unless they are: (1) necessary and integral part of otherwise covered services; (2) for the treatment of warts on the foot; (3) in the presence of a systemic condition or conditions; or (4) for the treatment of infected toenails. The OIG will review Part B payments to determine whether podiatry and ancillary services were medically necessary and supported in accordance with Medicare requirements.

 

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on Google+ or LinkedIn.

Subscribe to the Kusserow on Compliance Newsletter

Copyright © 2019 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.

Kusserow on Compliance: Compliance office budgets not likely to increase in 2019

– Half of compliance officers expect budget to remain the same

– Ten percent expect reductions

In the soon to be released national health care “2019 Compliance Benchmark Survey,” data was collected regarding what compliance officers were expecting in 2019 with respect to their budgets. The results are consistent with the past several years with half of respondents expecting their budget to remain essentially the same and 29 percent expecting increases slightly above their 2018 budgets. One out of ten expected budget reductions. The balance of compliance professionals were unsure. To accomplish the mission of building and operating an effective compliance program, there must be adequate budgetary resources. Given the combination of increasing responsibilities, noted elsewhere in the Survey, as well as a time of heightened enforcement by government agencies, it is likely that most compliance offices are stretching their limited resources. The Survey also found that many are turning to external vendors to provide services and tools, to stretch limited staff resources and to lower operating costs.

The “2019 Compliance Benchmark Survey” report will be available without charge at the upcoming HCCA conference in Boston at Strategic Management Services, Booth 420. 

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on Google+ or LinkedIn.

Subscribe to the Kusserow on Compliance Newsletter

Copyright © 2019 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.

Kusserow on Compliance: OIG adds new work plan items for 2019

The HHS OIG’s six new Active Work Plan (Work Plan) items for 2019, including the following:

  1. Medicare Payments for Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory Tests in 2018: Year 1 of New Payment Rates. Medicare Part B covers most lab tests and allowable charges without beneficiary copayments. The Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014 (PAMA) mandates CMS release an annual analysis of the top 25 laboratory tests by expenditures and for them to set payment rates for lab tests using current charges in the private health care market; and the OIG will conduct a study on this data.

 

  1. States’ Compliance with New Requirements to Prevent Medicaid Payments to Terminated Providers. The 21st Century Cures Act requires CMS to provide states with information on Medicaid providers that have been terminated to prevent them from treating enrollees or receiving Medicaid payments. The OIG will examine the extent to which the CMS terminations database have resulted in terminations of all state Medicaid programs and the amount of payments associated with terminated providers; and examine which contracts between states and managed care entities include a provision that excludes terminated providers from all managed care networks.

 

  1. Follow-up Review on Inpatient Claims Subject to the Post-Acute-Care Transfer Policy. Previous OIG reviews found (a) hospitals did not comply with the Medicare post-acute-care transfer policy, resulting in overpayments by the Medicare program; (b) hospitals would use the “to home” patient discharge status codes on their claims even though the patient was transferred to a post-acute-care setting; and (c) CMS’s common working file edits related to beneficiary transfers to home health care, SNFs, and non-IPPS hospitals were not working properly. The review will determine if CMS corrected the CWF edits, ensure that the edits are working properly, and that they recovered the identified overpayments.

 

  1. Utilization and Pricing Trends for Naloxone in Medicaid. Naloxone is a medication designed to rapidly reverse opioid overdose. There is concern its high cost may impede increased access to the drug. The OIG will (a) produce a data showing trends in utilization of and expenditures for naloxone in Medicaid over a 5-year period; (b) compare the cost-per-dose of naloxone under Medicaid compares to other available prices; and (c) determine the proportion of all naloxone paid for under Medicaid between 2014 and 2018.

 

  1. Medicare Outpatient Outlier Payments for Claims with Credits for Replaced Medical Devices. Hospitals are required to submit a zero or token charge when they receive a full credit for a replacement medical device, however CMS does not specify how to reduce charges for partial credits. The OIG will focus on overstated Medicare charges on outpatient claims that contain both an outlier payment and a reported medical device credit.
  1. Duplicate Payments for Home Health Agency (HHA) Services Covered Under Medicare and Medicaid. HHA coverage requirements state that they are responsible for providing all services either directly or under arrangement while a beneficiary is under a physician authorized home health plan of care.  Medicare pays a single HHA overseeing the plan.  For dual eligible beneficiaries with no other coverage who are receiving HHA services, Medicare is the first payer, because Medicaid is generally a payer of last resort.  The OIG will determine whether states made Medicaid payments for HHA services provided to dual eligible beneficiaries who are also covered under Medicare.

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on Google+ or LinkedIn.

Subscribe to the Kusserow on Compliance Newsletter

Copyright © 2019 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.