CHIP and DSHs face difficult financial roads without quick congressional move

Without congressional action, authorization for the Children’s Health Insurance Program will end on September 30, 2017, with the end of fiscal year (FY) 2017. Cuts to disproportionate share hospital (DSH) payments are also scheduled to take effect on October 1, 2017. If the authorization lapses and the cuts take effect, states will face budget shortages in their attempts to keep the CHIP program solvent and DSHs, which already operate on tight budgets, will be exposed to greater financial strain. A number of other health care related provisions are also slated to lapse on September 30, 2017, if Congress does not act, according to a Congressional Research Service (CSR) report.

Action

On September 28, 2017, the Energy and Commerce Committee announced that it would markup a bill to extend funding to the CHIP program. On the same day, members of Congress authored a letter to House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis) and Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif) expressing concerns regarding the impact of the DSH cuts and calling for congressional action.

DSH cuts

Stakeholders have made ongoing attempts to procure action from Congress to delay the DSH cuts. On September 18, nine hospital organizations urged lawmakers to further delay the start of Medicaid DSH cuts authorized by Section 2551 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) (P.L. 111-148) (see Hospital organizations again advocate for delay of Medicaid DSH reductions, September 19, 2017). The cuts would have gone into effect in 2014 but legislation delayed the reduction. The reduced payments were designed to account for decreases in uncompensated care, yet, DSHs warn that planned increases in coverage rates under the ACA have not been realized, exposing providers to unfair payment reductions.

CHIP

Although the impact of a delay in CHIP reauthorization will differ from state to state, a Kaiser Family Foundation analysis revealed that “states would face budget pressures, children would lose coverage, and implementation of program changes could result in increased costs and administrative burden for states” if Congress does not reauthorize the CHIP program by the end of FY 2017 (see States face budget shortages if Congress doesn’t extend CHIP funding, September 11, 2017).

Kusserow on Compliance: OIG reports the new Medicaid data system inadequate

The OIG reported that historical inadequacies in Medicaid data have hindered program integrity, research, budgeting, and policy. As a result the OIG has designated the improvement of Medicaid data as a top management HHS challenge. In 2016, the federal Government and states spent $574 billion on Medicaid, serving more than 74 million enrolled individuals. Complete, accurate, and timely Medicaid data are vital for the effective administration and oversight of the Medicaid program by states and the federal Government. The Transformed Medicaid Statistical Information System (T-MSIS) is a new data system that was developed to improve the completeness, accuracy, and timeliness of Medicaid data. The OIG provided a status update on the implementation of T-MSIS, building on its previous review of the 2013 T-MSIS pilot.

In conducting its review, the OIG analyzed the implementation status of T-MSIS using 40 states’ approved plans for data submission; and interviewed staff from CMS and 16 states about their experiences implementing T-MSIS. The OIG reported the following:

  1. States and CMS reported early implementation challenges resulted in delays with T-MSIS
  2. Technological problems and competing priorities for states’ resources caused delays
  3. The goal date for when T-MSIS will contain data from all states has been repeatedly postponed
  4. CMS expects that all states will be reporting to T-MSIS by the end of 2017
  5. 21 of 53 state programs were submitting data to T-MSIS
  6. States and CMS continue to raise concerns about completeness and reliability of the data
  7. States indicate that they are unable to report data for all the T-MSIS data elements
  8. Even with a revised data dictionary for each data element, states and CMS report concerns about states’ varying interpretations of data elements
  9. Without uniform interpretations of data elements, the data submitted will not be consistent across states, making any analysis of national trends or patterns inherently unreliable.

The OIG concluded that successfully getting all states’ data into T-MSIS requires states and CMS to prioritize T-MSIS implementation. However because of CMS’s history of delaying target dates for implementation, the OIG expressed concerned that CMS and states will delay further rather than assign the resources needed to address the outstanding challenges. The OIG further noted that without a fixed deadline, some states and CMS may not make the full implementation of T-MSIS a management priority.

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

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Copyright © 2017 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.

States face budget shortages if Congress doesn’t extend CHIP funding

“Without federal funding [for the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP)], states would face budget pressures, children would lose coverage, and implementation of program changes could result in increased costs and administrative burden for states as well as confusion for families,” according to a Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) report published on September 6, 2017. Federal funding for CHIP is set to expire on September 30, 2017. The KFF report provides an overview of states’ plans for CHIP in light of the uncertainty about the future of federal funding and describes how the lack of federal funding will impact states and how children and their families will be affected.

States’ CHIP programs

States can provide CHIP through a separate CHIP program, a CHIP-funded Medicaid expansion, or a combination of the two approaches. If federal funding ends, states with separate CHIP coverage would not be required to maintain coverage. Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Act (ACA) (P.L. 111-148); however, states with CHIP-funded Medicaid expansions or a combination of both approaches would be required to maintain this coverage under the maintenance of effort requirement (see ACA sections 2001, 2101, 10203). Without federal funding, states’ costs would increase, KFF predicted.

Findings from surveys of states

KFF and Health Management Associates surveyed state Medicaid officials about their current budgets and their future plans for the CHIP program.In addition, KFF, along with the Georgetown University Center for Children and Families, conducted interviews with several state CHIP directors.

Key findings include:

  • Forty-eight out of 50 responding states, including the District of Columbia, assumed continuation of federal CHIP funding in the fiscal year (FY) state budgets. Thirty-four states assumed the funding would continue with the 23% enhancement that was included in the ACA.
  • Because states assumed continued federal funding in their state budgets, the majority of the states will face a funding shortage if federal funding is not extended. KFF noted that because state budgets have passed, addressing shortfalls will likely require special legislative sessions and/or governor action. Challenges include replacing federal dollars, costs of implementing program changes as well as system changes, outreach and training costs, and costs to close out the program.
  • Ten states estimated that they would exhaust their FY 2017 CHIP allotment by the end of 2017. Thirty-two states projected they will exhaust their federal funding at the end of March of 2018.
  • The majority of states have not developed plans for actions they would take if Congress does not extend funding but some plan to close or cap enrollment and/or discontinue coverage for children in separate CHIP programs. A few states have state statutes that require them to close CHIP and discontinue coverage if federal funds for CHIP decrease. In a few states, CHIP-funded coverage for other groups such as pregnant women and children in buy-in programs would be at risk for cutbacks.

Impact of loss of CHIP coverage

If states close enrollment or discontinue coverage for children in separate CHIP programs, some children would be uninsured but others could shift to parents’ employer-sponsored plans or Marketplaces plans. Previous enrollment caps and freezes that were a result of state budget pressures, led to coverage losses, left eligible individuals without access to coverage and had negative effects on children’s health and family finances, according to KFF. When enrollment was frozen in Arizona, some children were moved to Medicaid, but six in ten likely were uninsured and the uninsured rate grew following the freeze. In North Carolina, the number of children placed on a waiting list rose to over 34,000. Parents with children affected by the freeze reported that the children needed care during the period they were uninsured. They reported delaying or difficulty in obtaining care for the children, difficulties in obtaining prescription medications for their children, and significant financial hardships.

Actions to prepare for lack of federal funding

States need sufficient time to notify families and other stakeholders of the changes in coverage, make changes to eligibility systems, and train eligibility workers. They must also update contracts with managed care plans and third party administrators and submit necessary state plan amendments. States also must be aware that the steps they take to prepare and costs that they incur may be wasted if they begin to implement the change and Congress takes action after the deadline to extend funding.

The ACA makes a measureable difference with HIV coverage

People with HIV experienced significant coverage gains under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) (P.L. 111-148) as a result of Medicaid expansion, the creation of the health insurance marketplaces, and the elimination of pre-existing condition exclusion. According to a Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) Issue Brief, as long as the future of the ACA remains uncertain, those access and coverage gains are at risk.

Baseline

To develop a baseline for understanding current access to care for people with HIV, KFF examined multiple variables across the three main pathways for HIV coverage and care: (1) Medicaid, (2) private insurance and the ACA marketplace, and (3) the Ryan White HIV/AIDS program. KFF considered factors like states’ Medicaid expansion status, the number of health insurance issuers per county, and AIDS Drug Assistance Program (ADAP) eligibility levels.

Medicaid 

Prior to the ACA’s Medicaid expansion, most individuals with HIV obtained Medicaid coverage through the disability pathway, meaning that coverage was often not obtained prior to a beneficiary’s development of AIDS. Currently, 62 percent of people with HIV live in a Medicaid expansion state, where care is more likely to be accessible through the income pathway, regardless of disability level. Additionally, 24 states provide Medicaid coverage through the disability pathway above the federally mandated level of 73 percent of the federal poverty level (FPL).

Marketplaces 

In 33 states, where 83 percent of people with HIV live, there are three or more issuers in the ACA marketplace. While five states—Arkansas, Oklahoma, South Carolina and Wyoming—had only one issuer in 2017, some states had several. For example, Wisconsin had 15 insurers, New York had 14, and California had 11. KFF also looked at issuer representation in counties with high incidence of people with HIV. While 43 percent of people with HIV live in one of the eighteen (18) states with an average of three or more issuers per county, the majority of people with HIV—57 percent—live in one of the 33 states with less competition—one or two issuers per county.

Ryan White

The Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program provides outpatient HIV care and treatment to low and moderate income individuals. The program serves more than half of the people diagnosed with HIV in the country. The average eligibility level for the medication assistance program is 386 percent FPL. While 17 states use an eligibility level of 400 percent, 72 percent of people with HIV live in a state with eligibility levels at or above the national average. While the Ryan White program would continue to operate with an ACA repeal, many individuals currently covered by marketplace or Medicaid plans would likely turn to the program for coverage. Due to the program’s limited resources, KFF estimates that such an over-reliance could cause individuals to lose access to care.