Kusserow on Compliance: Using sanction-screening tools vs. outsourcing the entire process

In order to save time and costs, more and more health care organizations have been moving to outsource functions that are not core business activities. Compliance programs have been part of that trend: (1) 80 percent of compliance offices use vendors to provide hotline services, (2) 50 percent of compliance offices use vendors to provide policy development tools, and (3) two-thirds of compliance offices use vendors to provide E-learning tools. Included in the growing list of outsourced tasks has been the movement to address the rapidly growing cost and time commitment obligations related to sanction-screening. Two-thirds of compliance offices use a vendor search engine tools to assist in sanction-screening that saves an organization from downloading the sanction databases and developing a search engine. This is a trend driven by the rapid development of many new databases against which to screen employees, medical professionals, contractors, vendors, etc., including the following:

  • OIG List of Excluded Individuals and Entities (LEIE)
  • GSA Excluded Parties List System (EPLS)
  • 40 Medicaid states now have sanction data bases requiring monthly screening
  • Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA)
  • FDA

All this has increased the burden of sanction-screening exponentially, not only for the compliance office, but also human resource management for new hires and periodic screening of current employees and procurement with vendors and contractors. Medical credentialing is involved as result of having to screen physicians who are granted staff privileges. Using vendors has been a great help, but the most difficult part of the process is resolving “potential hits.” This can be a considerable effort and many organizations have to dedicate staff for investigation and resolution of these hits. It is complicated by the fact that most sanction data does not provide sufficient information to make positive identification. As a result of this heavy burden, many have moved beyond simply using a vendor tool to outsourcing the entire process to vendors. The following address selecting a sanction-screening vendor and outsourcing the process.

 

Tips for selecting sanction-screening vendor

 

Tips for outsourcing the sanction-screening process

  • Determine the cost of moving from use of a vendor search engine tool to outsourcing the screening, along with investigation and resolution of “potential hits.”
  • Inquire as to the methodology they follow in resolving potential “hits,” a critical part of any screening effort.
  • Ensure the vendor provides a certified report of the results that can be made part of the compliance office records.
  • Review an example of the type of reports they would provide to determine if it meets the documentary needs of the organization.

 

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on Google+ or LinkedIn.

Subscribe to the Kusserow on Compliance Newsletter

Copyright © 2017 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.

Kusserow on Compliance: OIG opinion on the effect of exclusion

OIG Advisory Opinion 18-01 was issued in response to a request regarding the effect of an exclusion from Medicare, Medicaid, and all other Federal health care programs. As a result of criminal conviction for health care fraud pursuant to a civil False Claims Act (FCA) settlement, the Requestor agreed to be permanently excluded. The Requestor received a good faith employment offer from a newly formed, for-profit corporation that will be offering long-term care pharmacies (the LTC Pharmacies) access to discounted rates for emergency medications that the company negotiates with local retail pharmacies. The prices the company would charge for the medications the LTC Pharmacies obtain from the local retail pharmacies would be the discounted rate the company negotiated with the local retail pharmacies, plus a mark-up. The Requestor inquired whether the engagement proposal to market its services (the Proposed Arrangement) would violate the terms of the exclusion and constitute grounds for the imposition of sanctions.

The OIG concluded that, although the Proposed Arrangement could violate the terms of the exclusion and could constitute grounds for the imposition of sanctions, the OIG would not impose such sanctions in connection with the Proposed Arrangement, based upon the following representations:

  • Neither the Requestor nor the company would directly submit claims for items or services that are paid for by any federal health care program, including any medications the LTC Pharmacies obtain from the local retail pharmacies; and would not directly or indirectly have any role in the LTC Pharmacies’ or their customers’ submission of claims to any federal health care program.
  • Neither the Requestor nor the company would submit claims to Medicare, Medicaid, or any other federal health care program for any items or services provided in connection with the Proposed Arrangement.
  • The Requestor would market the company’s services to the LTC Pharmacies and offer them the opportunity to contract with the company to receive lower prices than they normally would pay when ordering emergency medications from a local retail pharmacy.
  • Neither the Requestor nor the company would exercise any direct or indirect control over determining the volume, type, and frequency of any medications they would need or order.
  • The company would pay the Requestor a fixed salary plus a commission based on the number of LTC Pharmacy accounts the Requestor secured for the company with no compensation determined based on the volume, value, frequency, price, or selection of any medications, including federally reimbursable medications, the LTC Pharmacies or their customers would order.
  • Neither the Requestor, nor any member of the immediate family would have direct or indirect control of the company.

 

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on Google+ or LinkedIn.

Subscribe to the Kusserow on Compliance Newsletter

Copyright © 2017 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.

Kusserow on Compliance: OIG summarizes investigative accomplishments from last three years

The OIG testified before the House Committee on Ways and Means and reported that in the last 3 fiscal years, its investigations have resulted in more than $10.8 billion in investigative receivables (dollars ordered or agreed to be paid to Government programs as a result of criminal, civil, or administrative judgments or settlements); 2,650 criminal actions; 2,211 civil actions; and 10,991 program exclusions. Much of this work involving the Medicare and Medicaid programs is funded by the Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control Program (HCFAC).  The HCFAC provides funding resources to the Department of Justice (DOJ), HHS, and OIG, which are often used collaboratively to fight health care fraud, waste, and abuse. Since its inception in 1997, the HCFAC has returned more than $31 billion to the Medicare trust fund.

The OIG is a lead participant in the DOJ led Medicare Fraud Strike Force, which combines the resources of Federal, state, and local law enforcement entities to fight health care fraud across the country. The Strike Force operates in nine geographic hot spots, including Miami, Florida; Los Angeles, California; Detroit, Michigan; southern Texas; Brooklyn, New York; southern Louisiana; Tampa, Florida; Chicago, Illinois; and Dallas, Texas. Strike Force teams are led by the DOJ, includes the FBI and the OIG, along with state and local law enforcement. In 2017 alone Strike Force teams accounted for over 2,000 criminal actions with about 3,000 indictments, and accounted for monetary results of around $3 billion. Since its inception in March 2007, the Strike Force has charged more than 3,000 defendants who collectively billed the Medicare program more than $10.8 billion.

The OIG also collaborates with state Medicaid Fraud Control Units (MFCUs) to detect and investigate fraud, waste, and abuse in state Medicaid programs, as well as private sector stakeholders to enhance the relevance and impact of its work to combat health care fraud, as demonstrated by its leadership in the Healthcare Fraud Prevention Partnership (HFPP) and collaboration with the National Health Care Anti-Fraud Association (NHCAA). The OIG strives to cultivate a culture of compliance in the health care industry through various educational efforts, such as Pharmacy Diversion Awareness Conferences, public outreach, and consumer education.

 

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on Google+ or LinkedIn.

Subscribe to the Kusserow on Compliance Newsletter

Copyright © 2017 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.

Medicaid and CHIP are catching uncovered kids, the ACA helps

Due to high rates of Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) coverage for young children, only 3.3 percent of children ages three and younger were uninsured in 2016. Coverage of both young children (age three and younger) and their parents increased under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) (P.L. 111-148) in 2014 and 2015—a trend that continued in 2016. According to an Urban Institute report, young children and their families continued to rely on Medicaid and CHIP in 2016, with 48.5 percent of young children covered by Medicaid or CHIP. In comparison, only 42 percent of older children were covered by the programs.

Trends. Nearly half of young children and one-fifth of the parents of young children were covered by Medicaid and CHIP in 2015 as well. The high incidence of Medicaid and CHIP coverage is partly due to higher incidence of family characteristics among parents of younger children, including lower incomes, younger parents, and mixed immigration status.

Variance. Despite high overall levels of coverage, the prevalence of health insurance coverage for young children and their families continued to vary across state lines. Uninsurance rates were below 2 percent in 12 states but above 8 percent in three states—Alaska, Wyoming, and North Dakota. Additionally, the expansion of state Medicaid programs under the ACA continues to be a significant source of variation in state uninsurance levels for the parents of young children. For example, an estimated 8.7 percent of parents of young children in expansion states were uninsured in 2016, whereas 18 percent of parents of young children were uninsured in nonexpansion states.