Kusserow on Compliance: OIG reports top unimplemented recommendations

The HHS Office of Inspector General (OIG) Top Unimplemented Recommendations: Solutions to Reduce Fraud, Waste, and Abuse in HHS Programs is an annual OIG publication. These recommendations, if implemented, are ones that would most positively impact HHS programs in terms of cost savings, program effectiveness and efficiency, and public health and safety. All were derived from audits and evaluations issued through December 31, 2019, which predated the COVID-19 public health emergency. Fourteen of the 25 were related to Medicare and Medicaid. The recommendations called for CMS to:

  1. Take actions to ensure that incidents of potential abuse or neglect of Medicare beneficiaries are identified and reported.
  2. Reevaluate the inpatient rehabilitation facility payment system, which could include seeking legislative authority to make any changes necessary to more closely align inpatient rehabilitation facility payment rates and costs.
  3. Seek legislative authority to comprehensively reform the hospital wage index system.
  4. Seek legislative authority to implement least costly alternative policies for Part B drugs under appropriate circumstances.
  5. Provide consumers with additional information about hospices’ performance via Hospice Compare.
  6. Continue to work with the Accredited Standards Committee X12 to ensure that medical device-specific information is included on claim forms and require hospitals to use certain condition codes for reporting device replacement procedures.
  7. Analyze the potential impacts of counting time spent as an outpatient toward the three-night requirement for skilled nursing facility (SNF) services so that beneficiaries receiving similar hospital care have similar access to these services.
  8. Provide targeted oversight of Medicare Advantage organizations (MAOs) that had risk adjusted payments resulting from unlinked chart reviews for beneficiaries who had no service records in the 2016 encounter data.
  9. Require MAOs to submit ordering and referring provider identifiers for applicable records in the encounter data.
  10. Develop and execute a strategy to ensure that Part D does not pay for drugs that should be covered by the Part A hospice benefit.
  11. Ensure that States’ reporting of national Medicaid data is complete, accurate, and timely.
  12. Collaborate with partners to develop strategies for improving rates of follow-up care for children treated for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
  13. Develop policies and procedures to improve the timeliness of recovering Medicaid overpayments and recover uncollected amounts identified by OIG’s audits.
  14. Identify States that have limited availability of behavioral health services and develop strategies and share information to ensure that Medicaid managed care enrollees have timely access to these services.

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on LinkedIn.

Subscribe to the Kusserow on Compliance Newsletter

Copyright © 2020 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.

Kusserow on Compliance: Continued confusion regarding the CMS preclusion list

Those on list are prohibited from MA Plans or Part D Sponsors payment

Questions continue arise concerning the CMS Preclusion List final rule. The Preclusion List is a list generated by CMS that contains the names of prescribers, individuals, and entities that are unable to receive payment for Medicare Advantage (MA) items and service and or Part D drugs prescribed or provided to Medicare beneficiaries. The rule mandates Part D sponsors, or their pharmacy benefit managers, to screen against the Preclusion List and reject any pharmacy claim prescribed by an individual or entity on it. MA plans must deny payment for a health care item or service furnished by an individual or entity on the list. Plans and sponsors must also notify impacted beneficiaries who received care or a prescription from a provider on the Preclusion List in the last twelve months. The list includes those who are currently revoked from Medicare, are under an active reenrollment bar, and whose underlying conduct CMS has determined to be detrimental to the Medicare program; or have engaged in behavior for which CMS could have revoked the prescriber and determined the underlying conduct would have led to the revocation. Such conduct includes, but is not limited to: felony convictions and OIG exclusions. CMS indicated that individuals or entities appearing on the List of Excluded Individuals/Entities (LEIE) and/or the System for Award Management (SAM) list would also be placed on the Preclusion List.

MA plans and Part D sponsors are required to access the list through an Enterprise Identity Data Management (EIDM) account with CMS. The list is updated monthly.  The causes for most of the confusion is that only plans approved by CMS are granted access to the Preclusion List. As a result, many if not most, organizations use a vendor for sanction screening services. However, the vendors are not always given access to the List.  The way around this obstacle has been for Plans to give their vendor the list and have them include it in their screening services. Another point of confusion is that technically, it is not a sanction list. It includes many parties who have not been formally sanctioned to be included on the OIG LEIE, although many on the list are also on the LEIE.

 

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on LinkedIn.

Subscribe to the Kusserow on Compliance Newsletter

Copyright © 2020 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.

Kusserow on Compliance: OIG program exclusions reported for second half of 2019

Total of 2640 new exclusions added to the LEIE in 2019

Under the Social Security Act, the HHS Office of Inspector General (OIG) is able to exclude individuals and entities from participation in Medicare, Medicaid, and other Federal health care programs. Exclusions are required (mandatory exclusion) for individuals and entities convicted of the following types of criminal offenses: (1) Medicare or Medicaid fraud; (2) patient abuse or neglect; (3) felonies for other health care fraud; and (4) felonies for illegal manufacture, distribution, prescription, or dispensing of controlled substances. The OIG is also authorized (permissive exclusion) to exclude individuals and entities on several other grounds, including misdemeanors for other health care fraud (other than Medicare or Medicaid); suspension or revocation of a license to provide health care for reasons bearing on professional competence, professional performance or financial integrity; provision of unnecessary or substandard services; submission of false or fraudulent claims to a federal health care program; or engaging in unlawful kickback arrangements. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) added another basis for imposing a permissive exclusion, that is, knowingly making, or causing to be made, any false statements or omissions in any application, bid, or contract to participate as a provider in a federal health care program, including managed care programs under Medicare and Medicaid, as well as Medicare’s prescription drug program.

During this semiannual reporting period, the OIG excluded 1,347 individuals and entities from Medicare, Medicaid, and other federal health care programs. Most of the exclusions resulted from convictions for crimes relating to Medicare or Medicaid, patient abuse or neglect, financial misconduct, controlled substances, or as a result of license revocation. The OIG completed the deployment of a new service for State Medicaid Fraud Control Units (MFCUs) to report convictions through a central web-based portal for exclusion. This improved reporting from those agencies. A list of excluded individuals and entities can be found at https://exclusions.oig.hhs.gov/.

 

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on LinkedIn.

Subscribe to the Kusserow on Compliance Newsletter

Copyright © 2020 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.

Kusserow on Compliance: New CMS proposed outpatient rules

The 2020 annual rule cycle has been active for CMS with several proposed rules in the outpatient prospective payment system (OPPS) area. Hospitals and health system executives should monitor these annual rules carefully for provisions that will affect their organizations’ operations. Among the significant regulatory rule proposals for hospital and health system executives are the following:

  1. Mandated disclosure of negotiated charges between health plans and hospitals for all items and services for about 300 “shoppable” services
  2. Proposed penalties which would be over $100,000 a year for noncompliant hospitals
  3. The addition of several ASC procedures
  4. The removal of total hip arthroplasty from the inpatient-only list for 2020, allowing the procedure to be performed on an outpatient basis
  5. Reduction of supervision level for hospital outpatient department from direct to general for hospital outpatient departments
  6. A requirement for prior authorization of certain outpatient department services.
  7. Continued payment reduction for 340B purchased drugs
  8. Increased per-day cost threshold for separate payment for certain outpatient drugs
  9. The establishment a prior authorization process for five categories of services that often may be cosmetic: blepharoplasty, botulinum toxin injections, panniculectomy, rhinoplasty, and vein ablation
  10. Various updates to Hospital Outpatient Quality Reporting Program requirements

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on LinkedIn.

Subscribe to the Kusserow on Compliance Newsletter

Copyright © 2019 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.