Kusserow on Compliance: CMS Preclusion list

Those on Preclusion List are prohibited from MA Plan or Part D sponsor payment

Effective April 2019, under a final rule published by CMS, Part D sponsors, or their pharmacy benefit manager must screen against the Preclusion List and reject any pharmacy claim prescribed by an individual or entity on the Preclusion List. Additionally, effective April 2019, MA plans must deny payment for a health care item or service furnished by an individual or entity on the list. Plans and sponsors must also notify impacted beneficiaries who received care or a prescription from a provider on the Preclusion List in the last twelve months. The list includes those who are currently revoked from Medicare; are under an active reenrollment bar, where CMS has determined that the underlying conduct is detrimental to the Medicare program; or have engaged in behavior for which CMS could have revoked the prescriber and determined the underlying conduct would have led to the revocation. Such conduct includes, but is not limited to, felony convictions and OIG exclusions. Only health care plans approved by CMS will have access to the Preclusion List. MA plans and Part D sponsors will be required to access the list through an Enterprise Identity Data Management (EIDM) account with CMS.  The List will be updated around the first business day of each month. CMS indicated that individuals or entities appearing on the List of Excluded Individuals/Entities (LEIE) and/or the System for Award Management (SAM) list would also be placed on the Preclusion List.

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on Google+ or LinkedIn.

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Copyright © 2019 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.

MedPAC votes to recommend recalculation of MA benchmarks

The Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC) unanimously voted to recommend that the HHS Secretary modify the calculation of Medicare Advantage (MA) benchmarks. The recommended change, discussed at the January 12, 2017, MedPAC meeting, would increase spending between $750 million and $2 billion over one year and between $5 billion to $10 billion over five years. Mark Miller, executive director of MedPAC, suggested, however, that previous coding recommendations from the June 2016 report could offset the increased cost.

CMS sets the MA county benchmark based on the average risk-adjusted per capita Part A and Part B fee-for-service (FFS) spending in the county. While this calculation includes all beneficiaries in Part A or Part B, MA enrollees must be in both Part A and Part B. MedPAC policy analyst Scott Harrison noted that 12 percent of FFS beneficiaries are enrolled in Part A only, and Part A-only beneficiaries spend less than half than what those with Part A and Part B spend on Part A. This, he said results in an underestimate of FFS spending compared to MA spending, which leads, in turn, to an understatement of MA benchmarks.

To make calculations more reflective of MA enrollment, the members voted on a draft recommendation, which they also discussed at the December 2016 meeting, that the HHS Secretary should calculate MA benchmarks using FFS spending data only for beneficiaries enrolled in both Part A and Part B.

CMS already adjusts the rate calculation in Puerto Rico so that it is based on beneficiaries who are enrolled in both Part A and Part B. In the April 2016 Announcement of Calendar Year 2017 Medicare Advantage Capitation Rates and Medicare Advantage and Part D Payment Policies and Final Call Letter, CMS stated in response to a comment that it would consider expanding this Part A and Part B adjustment to all counties in the future.

At the same meeting, MedPAC also voted to recommend that the Secretary should require hospitals to add a modifier on claims for all surgical services provided at off-campus, stand-alone emergency department facilities. The modifier would allow Congress and CMS to track the growth of off-campus emergency departments, which are reimbursed at higher rates than urgent care centers.

FDA, CMS facilitate continuity between approval of, payment for medical products

Fragmentation in the process of approving and clearing drugs for marketing by the FDA and then clearing drugs for coverage by CMS has led to questions regarding whether FDA approval necessarily results in approval for coverage and payment under Medicare and Medicaid. In a Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) perspective written by CMS Acting Administrator Andy Slavitt, FDA Commissioner Robert Califf, and FDA Deputy Commissioner for Medical Products and Tobacco Rachel Sherman, the authors posit that, despite such challenges, changes in the organization of health care and the larger technology landscape should allow the FDA and CMS to move toward the use of shared sources of evidence while still applying the most appropriate criteria to decision making.

In product approval and clearance for marketing by the FDA and in coverage and payment determinations by CMS, the agencies use scientific evidence to make determinations. The use of shared sources of evidence would help to reduce gaps in information that could lead to uncertainty in the approval or clearance of new therapies, as well as their subsequent use in medical treatment. Shared information would also increase efficiency in medical product development and ensure the use of high-quality evidence.

It is standard practice to use in the approval and clearance for marketing process research examining the effects of therapeutics in narrow, strictly delineated populations that may not reflect the clinical practice settings in which the products will be used. The authors stressed that when a product demonstrates promise in this narrow setting, developers should pivot quickly toward evaluating the product, using “evidence about the risks and benefits of tangible health outcomes in clinical settings and among patients representative of those who will actually use these products.” The expansion of the scope of research used in the approval and clearance process will help show how a product is likely to perform and how to utilize the product in treatment.  Garnering early involvement of health systems and payers will help the agencies to determine what kinds of evidence are needed to incorporate the product in practice, where the product fits in formularies and device inventories, and whether or how much to pay for its use.

The FDA and CMS are focusing on the following to ensure that adequate evidence is available to guide patients, clinicians, and payers in their choices:

  • clarifying the need for including diverse populations and measuring relevant clinical outcomes within the trials conducted for regulatory approval and to inform labeling;
  • collaborating with other federal agencies to build functional links across a range of systems to make the best use of existing digital information captured in the course of health care delivery, such as electronic health records, insurance claims, and data within clinical registries; and
  • ensuring broad collaboration across public and private sectors.

Kusserow on Compliance: CMS continued to pay millions of dollars for incarcerated beneficiaries

A couple years ago the OIG issued a report, followed by a public outcry about Medicare paying claims for incarcerated beneficiaries. The simple fact is that those in custody of a governmental entity are not eligible for Medicare. Last year Congress passed a law mandating CMS to establish policies and implement claims audits to ensure that payments are not made for Medicare services rendered to incarcerated beneficiaries and steps to detect and recoup payments made for instances in which an individual’s incarcerated status is not updated on CMS’s data systems. Under the same law, the OIG was mandated to submit a report to Congress within 18 months of passage, and periodically thereafter, on CMS actions to prevent payments made for incarcerated beneficiaries. The OIG issued an audit report on their evaluation of 2015 CMS policies and procedures and their planned revisions to them. They compared this information against requirements prohibiting payment for Medicare services rendered to incarcerated beneficiaries.

OIG findings

  1. CMS’s is not in full compliance with Medicare requirements.
  2. CMS failed to detect and recoup improper payments on behalf of incarcerated beneficiaries because they turned off its post payment claims edit to identify those claims.
  3. Medicare paid 63,949 claims of 11,786 incarcerated beneficiaries ($34,588,984) CY 2013-2014.
  4. CMS has not taken steps to act on the identified potentially improper payments.
  5. Failure to detect occurred in September 2013 when CMS turned off a post payment claims edit that it had created in April 2013.
  6. CMS planned revisions to its policies and procedures to deny Medicare payments for the same period that SSA suspends its benefits does not comply with the legal mandates.

OIG recommendations

CMS did not concur with the first recommendation listed below but did so for the other two.

  1. Develop and implement a system that allows CMS to collect the information necessary to fully comply with Medicare requirements that prohibit payment for Medicare services rendered to incarcerated beneficiaries and, if necessary, seek the appropriate legislation and funding;
  2. Review the $34.6 million in claims to determine which portion, if any, was not claimed in accordance with Medicare requirements and direct the Medicare contractors to recoup any ensuing improper payments; and
  3. Identify improper payments made on behalf of incarcerated beneficiaries after our audit period and ensure that Medicare contractors recoup those payments.

CMS officials stated that CMS is planning to obtain the dates that SSA uses to suspend benefits and plans to deny Medicare payments for incarcerated beneficiaries for the same periods that SSA suspends its own benefits for the same individuals.

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on Google+ or LinkedIn.

Subscribe to the Kusserow on Compliance Newsletter

Copyright © 2016 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.