Kusserow on Compliance: DOJ and HHS OIG issue annual Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control Program Report

The HHS OIG and DOJ issued their annual Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control Program Report. The report outlines efforts undertaken annually as a result of HIPAA, which established the program to “coordinate federal, state, and local law enforcement activities with respect to health care fraud and abuse.” For FY 2019 the reported recoveries were $3.6 billion, of which about $2.5 billion was returned to the Medicare trust fund. The recoveries included judgments and settlements from fraud causes brought in 2019 and in prior years. In addition, the DOJ reported opening 1,060 new criminal health care fraud investigations, which led to charges against 814 defendants. The DOJ Civil Division opened 1,112 new civil health care fraud investigations. Medicare and Medicaid fraud investigations by HHS’s Office of Inspector General resulted in 747 criminal actions and 684 civil actions against individuals and entities. In 2019, HHS also excluded 2,640 individuals from participation in the Medicare and Medicaid programs. The breakdown of exclusions included 1,194 based on criminal convictions related to Medicare and Medicaid, 335 for other health care programs, 238 for patient abuse or neglect, and 576 as a result of state health care licensure revocations.

The report also provided information on the return on investment (ROI) for the HCFAC program over the last three years (2017 – 2019) at $4.2 returned for every $1.00 expended. Results were reported as being in large measure due to the Health Care Fraud Prevention and Enforcement Action Team (HEAT) that was designed to coordinate enforcement efforts related health care fraud. These teams are comprised of top-level law enforcement agents, prosecutors, attorneys, auditors, evaluators, and other staff from DOJ and HHS and their operating divisions, and are dedicated to joint efforts across government to both prevent fraud and enforce current anti-fraud laws around the country. The Strike Force teams are a key component of HEAT.

 

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on LinkedIn.

Subscribe to the Kusserow on Compliance Newsletter

Copyright © 2020 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.

Kusserow on Compliance: OIG response plan—four goals for the COVID-19 Crisis

The HHS Office of Inspector General (OIG) has identified four goals to respond to the COVID-19 Pandemic: protecting people, protecting funds, protecting infrastructure, and promoting effectiveness. The OIG set out its framework in the OIG Strategic Plan: Oversight of COVID-19 Response and Recovery.

PROTECT PEOPLE. The OIG plans for this goal include to: (1) issue guidance on its administrative fraud enforcement authorities related to delivering needed patient care; (2) conduct rapid-cycle reviews of conditions affecting HHS beneficiaries or health care providers; (3) inform/support response efforts; (4) help ensure continuity of HHS operations during the public health emergency; (5) identify and investigate fraud and scams that endanger HHS beneficiaries and the public; (6) alert the public to fraud schemes related to COVID-19; and (7) assess the impacts of HHS programs on the health and safety in the acquisition, management, and distribution of COVID-19 tests and vaccine and treatment research and development.

PROTECT FUNDS. HHS was appropriated $251 billion for COVID-19 response and recovery—to prevent, prepare for, and respond to coronavirus, along with funds from other appropriations. The OIG plans for this  goal include: (1) reviewing of oversight, management, and internal controls for awarding, disbursement, and use of funds; (2) assessing whether recipients met requirements; (3) mitigating major risks that cut across program and agency boundaries; (4) ensuring that intended purposes of funds granted are being used properly; (5) identifying and investigating suspected fraud and exercising OIG’s administrative enforcement authorities; (6) identifying program integrity vulnerabilities and recommend safeguards; and (7) providing alerts to potential fraud risks or schemes to steal funds.

PROTECT INFRASTRUCTURE. Objectives for this goal include: (1) protecting the security and integrity of IT systems and health technology; (2) identifying IT vulnerabilities and incidents, mitigating threats, and restoring IT services; and (3) focusing on identifying and investigating cybersecurity vulnerabilities related to COVID-19 response.

PROMOTE EFFECTIVENESS. The OIG’s plans for this goal include: (1) focusing on COVID-19 efforts to identify successful practices and lessons learned from the emergency preparedness and response; (2) reviewing pandemic preparedness planning to identify how preparedness funding was spent; and (3) assessing COVID-19 impact on HHS programs and beneficiaries, including expanded telehealth in Medicare.

 

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on LinkedIn.

Subscribe to the Kusserow on Compliance Newsletter

Copyright © 2020 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.

Kusserow on Compliance: OIG Strategic plan outlines top priorities for 2020 – 2025

 The HHS Office of Inspector General (OIG) has identified seven major initiatives as part of its strategic plan for the period between 2020 and 2025. The initiatives include: (1) fraud and abuse protections; (2) safeguarding the Medicare trust funds; (3) protecting beneficiaries from prescription drug abuse; (4) combating health care cybersecurity threats; (5) promoting patient safety and accuracy of payments in home and community settings; (6) leveraging technology; and (7) ensuring HHS managed care and new health care models produce value.

  1. Fraud and Abuse Protections. OIG audits of national Medicaid data found substantial improper payments to providers for Medicaid Services; states were not always correctly determining lack of eligibility of individuals for Medicaid benefits. These two areas will be a focus for OIG oversight.
  2. Safeguarding the Medicare Trust Funds. The OIG plans to use data analytics to identify program areas and geographic areas of high-risk. It should provide strategic oversight of emergency preparedness and response affecting Medicare beneficiaries, Medicare Advantage, prescription drug spending, and the transition to value-based care.
  3. Protecting Beneficiaries from Prescription Drug Abuse, Including Opioids. The OIG’s efforts will focus on identifying opportunities to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of monitoring and identifying and holding accountable those engaged in fraud and abuse related to prescription drugs. Major efforts will include empowering partners through data sharing and education.
  1. Combatting Health Care Cybersecurity Threats. The OIG will increase efforts to combat cybersecurity threats, including hacking attacks, manipulation of medical devices, and inappropriate access to U.S. genomic data. The OIG will perform more cybersecurity audits of HHS agencies and programs, in partnership with other agencies, to conduct investigations that may involve espionage or foreign threats.
  1. Promoting Patient Safety and Accuracy of Payments in Home and Community Settings. The OIG plans increased efforts to reduce improper payments for services in noninstitutional settings, including home health. The OIG’s plans include outreach, education, audits, evaluations, inspections, investigations, and administrative enforcement.
  1. Leveraging Technology as it Intersects with HHS Programs. The OIG highlights that technology can be used to increase the efficiency, quality, and accessibility of the health care system. The OIG will work with other HHS agencies, patients, and providers to educate and oversee the use of health technology to positively impact providers and patients. The OIG will also assess how it can use Artificial Intelligence to foster value and quality in HHS programs.
  1. Ensuring HHS Managed Care and New Healthcare Models Produce Value. As CMS programs shift to value-based care and payment, the OIG has identified three elements that are critical to achieving better value, quality, and outcomes: (1) aligning program incentives with improved health outcomes; (2) strengthening program integrity; and (3) delivering innovative technology. The OIG will oversee the continued transition to value-based programs and will address and combat any issues of fraud, waste, and abuse.

 

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on LinkedIn.

Subscribe to the Kusserow on Compliance Newsletter

Copyright © 2020 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.

Kusserow on Compliance: Continued confusion regarding the CMS preclusion list

Those on list are prohibited from MA Plans or Part D Sponsors payment

Questions continue arise concerning the CMS Preclusion List final rule. The Preclusion List is a list generated by CMS that contains the names of prescribers, individuals, and entities that are unable to receive payment for Medicare Advantage (MA) items and service and or Part D drugs prescribed or provided to Medicare beneficiaries. The rule mandates Part D sponsors, or their pharmacy benefit managers, to screen against the Preclusion List and reject any pharmacy claim prescribed by an individual or entity on it. MA plans must deny payment for a health care item or service furnished by an individual or entity on the list. Plans and sponsors must also notify impacted beneficiaries who received care or a prescription from a provider on the Preclusion List in the last twelve months. The list includes those who are currently revoked from Medicare, are under an active reenrollment bar, and whose underlying conduct CMS has determined to be detrimental to the Medicare program; or have engaged in behavior for which CMS could have revoked the prescriber and determined the underlying conduct would have led to the revocation. Such conduct includes, but is not limited to: felony convictions and OIG exclusions. CMS indicated that individuals or entities appearing on the List of Excluded Individuals/Entities (LEIE) and/or the System for Award Management (SAM) list would also be placed on the Preclusion List.

MA plans and Part D sponsors are required to access the list through an Enterprise Identity Data Management (EIDM) account with CMS. The list is updated monthly.  The causes for most of the confusion is that only plans approved by CMS are granted access to the Preclusion List. As a result, many if not most, organizations use a vendor for sanction screening services. However, the vendors are not always given access to the List.  The way around this obstacle has been for Plans to give their vendor the list and have them include it in their screening services. Another point of confusion is that technically, it is not a sanction list. It includes many parties who have not been formally sanctioned to be included on the OIG LEIE, although many on the list are also on the LEIE.

 

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on LinkedIn.

Subscribe to the Kusserow on Compliance Newsletter

Copyright © 2020 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.