FDA considers a benefit-risk assessment for opioid analgesics

The FDA issued a draft guidance for the pharmaceutical industry when providing information in a new drug application (NDA) for opioid analgesic drugs. The FDA assesses risks and benefits of all drugs in the context of their labeled uses when reviewing NDAs. However, because of the widespread abuse of opioids the FDA will also consider the broader public health effect, including the risks related to misuse, abuse, opioid use disorders, accidental exposure, and overdoses for patients and others. The guidance details what data is required for the FDA to complete their benefit-risk analysis after receiving an NDA (Notice, 84 FR 29211, June 21, 2019).

Patient benefits. For the FDA to analyze patient benefits, pharmaceutical companies submitting opioid NDAs should show the efficacy and safety of the drug when used for its proposed indication. The NDA should provide a body of evidence supporting a finding of drug efficacy, what patient population was used and why, and a proposed duration of use for each proposed indication. In addition to efficacy, the companies should show the safety of the drug when used for its proposed use. The NDA should show drug safety by submitting supporting data of drug characteristics that mitigate adverse events associated with opioids, such as respiratory depression, sedation, and constipation. The FDA would also need data supporting any drug characteristics that mitigate risks of opioid use disorder.

Patient risks. In addition to the already known risks of opioids, the FDA will also consider questions about the risks to patients who are prescribed the drug and use it as labeled and directed by their physicians. The NDAs should provide data to support the answers to the following questions:

  • Does the drug have any risks not normally associated with opioid use? How serious are these risks, and can they be mitigated? Are the risks reversible?
  • Does the drug formulation cause any risks such as tablets that swell in the GI tract or stick to mucous membranes? For drugs formulated with abuse-deterrent properties, are there any risks associated with formulation?
  • Does the drug have characteristics that increase or decrease the risks of respiratory depression, sedation, or development of opioid dependence? Can packaging particulars or storage and disposal conditions mitigate the risks?
  • Is there evidence that typical adverse events associated with opioids occur at a higher rate?

Effectiveness and safety. The FDA considers the benefits and risks relative to other available treatment options for the prescribed condition. The comparative data of the drug to other treatment options is valuable, but the FDA notes, it is not required to be found superior to other options, to be approved for an ANDA. The FDA will consider the following questions when determining the effectiveness and safety of drugs in ANDAs:

  • Does efficacy data exist comparing the drug with other opioids or nonopioids for the condition? Does the drug have any advantages compared to other treatment options?
  • Does comparative safety data exist with other treatment options? Are there any safety advantages or disadvantages compared to other options?
  • What is the anticipated benefit-risk balance compared to other treatment options?
  • Does the drug have any other safety advantages over other treatment options?

Public health effects. The FDA proposed in the guidance that it would consider the greater public health effects of new opioids including patients and nonpatients. Nonpatients can be members of patient’s households, visitors to patient’s households and others. The risks are those related to misuse, abuse, opioid use disorder, accidental exposure, and overdose. The FDA will consider the following when analyzing public health effects:

  • Are there characteristics of the drug that increase or decrease risk of accidental exposure to children?
  • Are there characteristics of the drug that increase risk of misuse, abuse, and related adverse outcomes? Can the risks be mitigated?
  • Are there risks with the method of delivery?
  • Are there any potential unintended adverse consequences?
  • Safety of unintended routes of administration such as intravenous, intranasal, or inhalation
  • Discussion of anticipated use-specific subpopulations such as teens or patients with mental health disorders and how to mitigate such risks

Risk management. The FDA determined that there is a risk evaluation and mitigation strategy necessary for all opioid drugs intended for outpatient use to make sure the benefits outweigh the risks. The mitigation strategy requires training for all health care providers involved in the treatment of pain. To meet this requirement drug companies with approved opioid NDAs must provide grants to continuing education providers for development of these training courses. Any NDA must include any risk evaluation and mitigation strategies thought to be necessary to make sure the benefits outweigh the risks of the opioid drug.

U.S. pays nearly twice as much for drugs compared to other countries

A recent HHS analysis revealed that prices charged by drug manufacturers to wholesalers and distributors in the United States are 1.8 times higher than in other countries for the top drugs by total expenditures separately paid under Medicare Part B. U.S. prices were higher for most of the drugs included in the analysis, and U.S. prices were more likely to be the highest prices paid among the countries in the study (ASPE Report, October 25, 2018).

Medicare Part B

Drugs typically administered to patients by healthcare practitioners are covered and paid under Medicare Part B, which is part of the fee for service traditional Medicare benefit. Under Part B, providers buy and bill for these drugs. Medicare pays suppliers and providers based upon the Average Sales Price (ASP) for each product, as reported by manufacturers to CMS. Physician offices that buy and bill Part B drugs are paid 106 percent of the drug’s ASP, and hospitals are reimbursed either at 106 percent or 77.5 percent of ASP, depending on the hospital outpatient department’s participation in a safety net drug pricing program. Spending on Part B drugs has doubled since 2006.

The analysis and results

Data was compiled on the top drugs based on total Medicare reimbursement to either physician offices, hospital outpatient departments, or overall under Medicare Part B in 2016. Countries included in the analysis included: the United States, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. The analysis identified thirty two Medicare Part B drugs among the top twenty drugs in spending for each setting. These thirty two drugs accounted for $18 billion in spending, out of a total $27 billion on Part B drugs across these settings. The main analysis reports on twenty seven Part B Drugs.

Across the twenty seven drugs in the study, the U.S. ex-manufacturer prices were 1.8 times than average international ex-manufacturer price. There was not any one country that consistently had the highest or lowest prices compared to the U.S. for twenty of the drug products; U.S. prices exceeded the average international price by more than twenty percent. In addition, for nineteen of the twenty seven products the U.S. prices were higher than any other country. Excluding the U.S., Germany and Canada had the highest prices for six drugs and Japan for five drugs. France and the United Kingdom had the lowest prices for four drug products. Japan, Sweden and Slovakia had the lowest prices for three drug products each. Finally, the analysis calculated that the Medicare program and its beneficiaries spent an additional $8.1 billion (47 percent more) on these twenty seven products that it would have, if payments based upon ASP were scaled by the international price ratios.

Overall, prices and reimbursement rates for Part B drugs are significantly higher for the U.S. providers than purchasers outside the U.S., except for a few outlier cases. The amount by which U.S. prices exceeded those of international comparators varied significantly by product, and there was no clear pattern as to which countries were consistently paying lower prices. The analysis suggests that Medicare Part B could achieve significant savings if prices in the U.S. were similar to those of other large market based economies.

Kusserow on Compliance: OIG toolkit for calculating opioid levels and opioid misuse risk

The OIG toolkit provides detailed steps for using prescription drug claims data to analyze patients’ opioid levels and identify certain patients who are at risk of opioid misuse or overdose. It is based on the methodology that OIG has developed in its extensive work on opioids. This provides technical information to support the OIG’s public and private sector partners, such as Medicare Part D plan sponsors, private health plans, and State Medicaid Fraud Control Units. It is intended to assist OIG partners with analyzing their own prescription drug claims data to help combat the opioid crisis. It provides steps to calculate patients’ average daily morphine equivalent dose (MED), which converts various prescription opioids and strengths into one standard value. This measure is also called morphine milligram equivalent (MME). The toolkit includes a detailed description of the analysis and programming code that can be applied to the user’s own data. The resulting data can be used to identify certain patients who are at risk of opioid misuse or overdose. Users can also modify the code to meet their needs, such as identifying patients at other levels of risk. The toolkit has three chapters:

 

(1) Analysis of Prescription Drug Claims Data,

(2) Explanation of the Programming Code To Conduct the Analysis, and

(3) Programming Code.

 

Opioid abuse and overdose deaths are at epidemic levels in the United States. As one of the lead federal agencies fighting health care fraud, the OIG is committed to supporting public and private partners in its efforts to curb the opioid epidemic. These partners include Medicare Part D plan sponsors, other private health plans, State Medicaid Fraud Control Units, State prescription drug monitoring programs, and researchers. They can use this toolkit to analyze claims data for prescription drugs and identify patients who may be misusing or abusing prescription opioids and may be in need of additional case management or other follow-up. This toolkit can also be used to answer research questions about opioid utilization.

Copies can be obtained by contacting the Office of Public Affairs at Public.Affairs@oig.hhs.gov.

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

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Copyright © 2018 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.

Draft guidance seeks to make drug labels clear, concise, more consistent

In an effort to assist applicants in writing the Indications and Usage section of labeling for human prescription drug and biological products, the FDA issued a new draft guidance. The FDA’s intent is to make information in prescription drug labeling easier for health care practitioners to access, read, and use. The goal of the guidance is to help ensure that the labeling is clear, concise, useful, and informative and, to the extent possible, consistent in content and format within and across drug and therapeutic classes (Notice, 83 FR 31759, July 9, 2018).

Indications

The Indications and Usage section should clearly communicate the scope of the approved indication, including the population to which the determination of safety and effectiveness is applicable. The guidance includes information on how and when evidence may support approval of an indication that is broader or narrower in scope than the precise population studied.

The indication should begin “Drug X is indicated” and be followed by the disease, condition, or manifestation of the cease or condition being treated, prevented, mitigated, cured, or diagnosed, and when applicable other information necessary to describe the approved indication. The other information may include selected patient subgroups or disease sub populations for whom the drug is approved, adjunctive or concomitant therapy or therapeutic modalities to use before initiation drug therapy, or specific tests needed to select patients in whom to use the drug.

Limitations of use

Limitations of use should be presented separately from the indication and should only be included when the awareness of such information is important for practitioners to ensure the safe and effective use of the drug. Limitations of Use are appropriate for drugs for which there is reasonable concern or uncertainty about effectiveness or safety in a certain clinical situation, drugs approved without evidence of benefits known to occur with other drugs in the same class, or drugs with dose, duration, or long-term use considerations.

Language

Certain products have statutory or regulatory required or recommended language for the Indications and Usage section. The guidance includes preferred wording and wording to generally avoid. For example, the guidance explains why it is better to use the phrase “reduce the risk” or “reduce incidence of” rather than using “prevent” in the indication. It also discusses when the terms “only” and “also indicated” should be avoided. Finally, product should be identified by the proprietary name or trade name if it has one, and other information such as the dosage form, and route of administration should not be included in the indication.