Webinar: Delay, Deregulate, Derail — Health Care Roiled by Actions of Trump and Congress

Since January, both President Trump and Republican leaders in Congress have talked about a three-step process for repealing and replacing the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). While the first six months of the Trump administration has seen mixed results, its efforts to reign in or hold back regulations, combined with its delay in filling lower-level agency roles, has impacted regulatory review and issuance of new regulations. So, despite Congress’ inability to pass legislation to change parts of the ACA, there is still plenty for providers to be concerned about.

Join Associate Managing Editor Kathryn Beard, JD, on Wednesday, August 2, for this half-hour live webinar covering attempts by the Trump Administration and Congress to delay, deregulate, and derail significant parts of federal health policy. She will discuss the two “repeal and replace” bills, FDARA, and significant executive and regulatory actions taken by the Trump administration which directly impact ACA provisions.

Registration Link:

Wolters Kluwer Announces White Paper Series on Healthcare Legislation

As federal lawmakers grapple with sweeping healthcare reform, Wolters Kluwer provides resources to help professionals stay ahead of reimbursement and compliance requirements

Wolters Kluwer Legal & Regulatory U.S. today announced the launch of an authoritative and timely white paper series to track updates and provide analysis on the American Health Care Act (AHCA) and Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA), the proposed replacements for the Affordable Care Act (ACA) under consideration in Congress.

The AHCA passed in the House of Representatives by a slim majority in May. A discussion draft of the BCRA was released in late June but the Senate has delayed any votes on the legislation until July. The first white paper in the series, entitled “How the AHCA Directly Impact Significant Parts of the ACA,” identifies and explains aspects of the ACA that are directly impacted by the AHCA. Wolters Kluwer’s white paper series will track the legislation as new versions of the bill become available.

“Considering the impending changes proposed by lawmakers, healthcare, legal and compliance professionals need to understand the evolving regulatory landscape,” said Paul Clark, Health Law Analyst for Wolters Kluwer’s Healthcare group. “Our series of white papers will help healthcare professionals to track changes in the legislation as they occur, measure the impacts, and manage compliance and reimbursement practices more efficiently.”

Download a free electronic copy of “How the AHCA Directly Impact Significant Parts of the ACA”

For those interested in daily, comprehensive coverage of the latest health law developments, Wolters Kluwer offers Health Law Daily providing in-depth analysis on new developments delivered directly to users’ device of choice every day. To learn more visit The Health Law Daily.

About Wolters Kluwer Legal & Regulatory U.S.

Wolters Kluwer Legal & Regulatory U.S. is part of Wolters Kluwer N.V. (AEX: WKL), a global leader in information services and solutions for professionals in the health, tax and accounting, risk and compliance, finance and legal sectors. We help our customers make critical decisions every day by providing expert solutions that combine deep domain knowledge with specialized technology and services.

Wolters Kluwer reported 2016 annual revenues of €4.3 billion. The company, headquartered in Alphen aan den Rijn, the Netherlands, serves customers in over 180 countries, maintains operations in over 40 countries and employs 19,000 people worldwide.

For more information about Wolters Kluwer Legal & Regulatory U.S., visit www.WoltersKluwerLR.com, follow us on FacebookTwitterand LinkedIn.

Media

Linda Gharib
Director, Communications
Wolters Kluwer Legal & Regulatory U.S.
Tel: +1 (646) 887-7962
Email: linda.gharib@wolterskluwer.com

Related Links

http://www.wolterskluwerlr.com

Energy and Commerce committee unanimously approves FDA reauthorization

The House Energy and Commerce Committee voted unanimously—54 to zero—to approve H.R. 2430, the Food and Drug Administration Reauthorization Act of 2017 (FDARA), after a markup on June 7, 2017. The bill would reauthorize the FDA’s user fee programs for prescription drug, medical device, generic drug, and biosimilar biological products. Without the reauthorization, the use fee programs will expire at the end of September, 2017.

The FDARA would renew the FDA’s authority to collect user fees from the makers of prescription brand drugs, medical devices, generic drugs, and biosimilars. The fees account for more than one-fourth of the agency’s funding (see HELP committee advances FDA user fee agreements to Senate floor, May 12, 2017).

The bill passed the committee with six amendments, offered by: Chairman Greg Walden (R-Ore), Rep. Ryan Costello (R-Pa), Rep. Scott Peters (D-Calif), Rep. Mimi Walters (R-Calif), and Rep. Jan Schakowsky (D-Ill). Rep. Schakowsky offered two amendments. The amendments are designed to further the development of generic therapies, update approval and quality reporting requirements for medical devices, allow for risk-based classification of accessories, foster the development of medical device safety surveillance pilots, and encourage steps to lower the cost of prescription drugs.

Medicaid’s role in low income individuals access to mental health services

Medicaid plays a significant role in providing treatment for low income individuals with mental health conditions. Medicaid recipients usage of mental health services “is comparable to and sometimes greater” than usage among privately insured individuals, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) analysis. In 2015, Medicaid covered 22 percent of nonelderly adults with mental illness and 26 percent of nonelderly adults with serious mental illness. KFF found that Medicaid coverage of mental health services is often more comprehensive than private insurance coverage.

Analysis Findings

The analysis (1) describes individuals with mental health conditions, and (2) compares the mental health needs and the receipt of services among individuals without insurance, with Medicaid, and with private insurance. KFF provided the following findings:

  • Characteristics of nonelderly adults with mental illness. Twenty percent of nonelderly adults have a mental illness. They are predominantly white, female, and under 50. Five percent have a serious mental illness. Most are employed (63 percent), but 4 in ten have low incomes and 22 percent are below poverty. In addition, nonelderly adults with mental illness often have co-morbid conditions.
  • Utilization of mental health services. Most nonelderly adults with mental illness have either Medicaid or private insurance. Those with Medicaid are more likely to receive treatment than those with private insurance or without insurance. In addition, the receipt of psychiatric medication is more common among those individuals covered by Medicaid.

The role of Medicaid expansion

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) (P.L. 111-148) and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (HCERA) (P.L. 111-152), (together referred to as the Affordable Care Act (ACA)) expanded Medicaid coverage to millions of low-income Americans. Sections 2001 and 2002 of the PPACA as amended by 1004 and 1201 of HCERA enabled many low-income individuals with mental health conditions to obtain coverage and access treatment through state Medicaid programs that choose to expand.

KFF pointed out that the American Health Care Act of 2017 (AHCA) (H.R. 1628), introduced by Republicans and passed by the House of Representatives on May 4, 2017 would limit enhanced federal support for the expansion population. The Congressional Budget Office projected that the reduction in federal funds would result in a cut of $834 billion over 10 years. “A reduction in federal funds of this magnitude would likely cause states to decrease Medicaid payment rates, covered services, and/or eligibility, limiting states’ ability to reach people with mental health conditions,” KFF said.