AHCA’s Patient and Stability Fund would benefit large states, study finds

Large states and states with fewer insurers offering coverage in the individual and small group markets could receive the most money under the American Health Care Act’s (AHCA) Patient and State Stability Fund, according to a study by Avalere. The AHCA, which consists of two bills that came out of the House Ways and Means and Energy and Commerce Committees, is touted as an effort to repeal and replace the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) (P.L. 111-148).

Bill

Section 132 of the Ways and Means bill would add title XXII to the Social Security Act to create the Patient and State Stability Fund. The Fund would provide funding for the states and District of Columbia from 2018 through 2026 for eligible states to do any of the following:

  • provide financial assistance to high-risk individuals who do not have employer health insurance to enroll in health insurance coverage in the state’s individual market;
  • provide incentives for entities to enter into agreements with the state to help stabilize health insurance premiums in the health insurance market;
  • reduce the cost for providing coverage in the individual and small group markets;
  • promote participation in the individual and small group markets and increase available insurance options;
  • promote access to preventive services, dental care, and certain services for individuals with mental or substance abuse disorders;
  • provide payments to providers for the provision of health care services as specified by the Administrator; and
  • provide assistance to reduce out-of-pocket costs for individuals enrolled in health insurance coverage in the state.

Funding

The bill would appropriate $100 billion over 10 years to provide allocations to states. According to Avalere, the first 85 percent of the funds would be distributed based on the share of the state’s insurance claims as a percentage of the nation, so states that have more people with insurance and higher medical costs could receive more funding that states lower overall enrollment and spending.

The remaining 15 percent would be distributed to states that have seen an increase in the number of low-income uninsured from 2013 to 2015 or have fewer than three insurers offering coverage in their exchange in 2017.

Distribution among states

According to Avalere, the allocation methodology could result in states like California, Florida, and New York receiving the most money North Carolina, Arizona, Alabama, Oklahoma, and South Carolina could receive disproportionately high amounts of money due to the lack of health insurance participation on their markets in 2017.

The funding levels “vary widely” on a per capita basis compared to the state’s individual market enrollment in 2015, Avalere concluded. They range from $1,830 in the District of Columbia to $220 in Montana.

FDA considers establishing a new ‘Office of Patient Affairs’

The FDA announced that it is establishing a public docket to solicit public input on ongoing efforts to enhance mechanisms for patient engagement at the agency. In addition, to achieve a more transparent, accessible, and robust experience for patient communities, the FDA is considering establishing a new Office of Patient Affairs.

On November 4, 2014, the FDA established a docket (FDA-2014-N-1698) for the public to submit information related to the FDA’s implementation of the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA) (P.L. 112-144), Patient Participation in Medical Product Discussions under FDASIA section 1137.

Based on the comments received, the FDA identified objectives for its patient engagement activities. First, to develop a nuanced understanding of the patient experience of disease by: (1) gathering patient perspective on what is clinically meaningful; (2) assessing attitudes towards benefit-risk and tolerance of uncertainty; and (3) enhancing the science of eliciting and integrating patient input.

Second, to support patients and their advocates in understanding regulatory processes and navigating the FDA by: (1) communicating relevant FDA positions, procedures, and activities; (2) connecting patients and their advocates with the appropriate resources; and (3) resolving discrete challenges and needs.

To achieve these objectives, the FDA is considering establishing a central “Office of Patient Affairs.” The responsibilities of this central office would include:

  • offering a single, central entry point to the FDA for the patient community;
  • providing triage and navigation services for inbound inquiries from patient stakeholders;
  • hosting and maintaining robust data management systems that would incorporate and formalize knowledge shared with the FDA by patient stakeholders and the FDA’s relationships with patient communities; and
  • developing a scalable and forward-looking platform for communicating with patient stakeholders, particularly online channels.

The Office of Patient Affairs would be directly accountable to the medical product Centers. A regular evaluation of this central office and of FDA’s overall patient engagement efforts are also proposed.

 

 

Highlight on Wisconsin: As opioid overdose and deaths rise, state seeks $15.7 million in SAMHSA support

The rate of opioid overdose deaths in Wisconsin has risen approximately 81 percent from 2006 through 2015, according to a new Wisconsin Department of Health Services (DHS) report, titled “Select Opioid-Related Morbidity and Mortality Data for Wisconsin.” In response, the Wisconsin DHS has submitted an application for up to $15.7 million in federal funding to boost the state’s response to the growing misuse and abuse of opioids from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). The amount of the grant is based on the unmet need for opioid-related treatment and the number of opioid-related deaths in the state. Wisconsin is eligible to receive up to $7,636,938 each year for the next two years under the 21st Century Cures Act.

The DHS report provides statewide and county-level data on opioid-related deaths and hospital visits, neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) (in which an infant is born with withdrawal symptoms from substances taken by the mother), and data on ambulance runs in which naloxone (a medication used to reverse opioid overdose) was administered. The report includes these data highlights:

  • The rate of opioid overdose deaths increased from 5.9 deaths/100,000 residents in 2006 to 10.7 deaths/100,000 in 2015.
  • Rates of drug overdose deaths involving opioids were higher among counties in the southeastern region of the state (Milwaukee area), and higher among men compared with women.
  • Drug overdose deaths involving opioids were highest among young men aged 25-34, and among women aged 35-54.
  • Hospital visits involving opioid acute poisoning (including overdose) increased from 25.3 to 52.0 per 100,000 between 2006 and 2014.
  • The rate of ambulance runs in which naloxone was administered rose from 51.2 to 67 per 100,000 from 2011 to 2015.
  • The rate of NAS increased from 2.0 to 8.7 per 1,000 live births from 2006 to 2014, a rate increase of 335 percent.

In 2016, DHS issued a Public Health Advisory due to the opioid epidemic. In 2017, Governor Scott Walker called for a special session of the legislature to consider recommendations presented by the Governor’s Task Force on Opioid Abuse. New legislative proposals will build on efforts already underway under the HOPE (Heroin, Opioid Prevention and Education) agenda, which includes 17 bills aimed at prevention and treatment of opioid addiction and overdose.

Pending approval from SAMHSA, the funds will be used to:

  • Support community coalitions focused on reducing the nonmedical use of opioids among people age 12 to 25.
  • Establish a hotline to provide information on treatment services and recovery supports.
  • Expand access to treatment for uninsured and underinsured individuals.
  • Establish new opioid-specific treatment programs to reduce the distance people have to travel for these services.
  • Establish a network of individuals in long-term recovery from the misuse and abuse of opioids trained to coach people through the treatment and recovery process.
  • Develop training for professionals on proven intervention and treatment strategies for opioid misuse and abuse.

 

Is the American Health Care Act a ‘critical first step’ or unsupportable?

HHS Secretary Tom Price, M.D., supports the reconciliation recommendations known as the American Health Care Act, and considers the changes a necessary and important first step in further reforming the U.S. health care system. In a letter to the chairs of the House Committees on Energy & Commerce and Ways & Means, Price explained that in his view, the proposed legislation aligns with President Donald Trump’s promise to repeal and replace the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) (P.L. 111-148). Two major industry groups, however, said that they could not support the current version of the bills.

American Health Care Act 

On March 6, 2017, House Speaker Paul Ryan announced the American Health Care Act, consisting of two committee “budget reconciliation legislative recommendations,” which would be passed under the provisions of S. Con. Res. 3, a resolution which developed a streamlined process for Congress to pass health reform without threat of Senate filibuster. The document from the Ways & Means Committee would alter many of the ACA’s tax provisions, including eliminating penalties related to the individual and employer mandates, while the Energy & Commerce Committee’s document focuses on changes to the Medicaid program (see Republicans present health reform that is neither repeal nor replacement, March 7, 2017). Both committees began markup on the bills less than two days after the documents were made public.

First step in Administration’s plan

According to Price, the reconciliation legislation is just the first of three planned steps in undoing the ACA’s reforms. The reconciliation process can only be used to change some ACA provisions, though not all, and also cannot be used for all of the Trump Administration’s planned reforms. To complete those changes, HHS has two more planned steps; first, taking administrative actions to provide patients with additional options and give states more flexibility in Medicaid spending, and second, to support legislation on Trump’s other priorities including sale of insurance across state lines and medical tort reform. HHS noted that the Administration has already begun work on the second step, including Trump’s Executive Order on minimizing the economic burden of the ACA (see Trump Administration previews health care plans with Executive Order, regulatory freeze, January 23, 2017) and a Proposed rule designed to stabilize the health insurance marketplace by altering enrollment periods and other rules.

AHA and AMA opposition

Two major stakeholders in the health reform debate are the American Hospital Association (AHA) and American Medical Association (AMA), both of which released statements saying that, as currently written, neither organization could support the American Health Care Act. AHA President and CEO Richard J. Pollack wrote a letter on behalf of the hospitals, health systems, health organizations, and clinician partners associated with the group, and first raised concerns about the lack of coverage estimates from the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) and asked that Congress wait until an estimate is available before proceeding with formal consideration of the Act. The letter also listed the AHA’s policy concerns, including the restructuring of Medicaid—which “already pays providers significantly less than the cost of providing care—and the elimination of funding sources while continuing the ACA”s reductions in hospital payments.

Similarly, AMA President Andrew W. Gurman, M.D., wrote that the Act would reverse the ACA’s coverage gains, with millions of Americans losing coverage, and insisted on the involvement of physicians in the health reform debate. AMA Vice President and CEO James L. Madara, M.D., wrote a letter to the Committee Chairs and Ranking Members in which he said the organization cannot support the Act as drafted “because of the expected decline in health insurance coverage and the potential harm it would cause to vulnerable patient populations.” He noted concerns that rolling back the ACA’s Medicaid expansion would limit state flexibility and urged the Committees to “do all that is possible” to prevent individuals who currently have health insurance from losing that coverage.