Tale of two mergers: Cigna-Anthem goes south; Humana, Aetna drop plans

Cigna Corp. has chosen to terminate its proposed merger agreement with Anthem, Inc., which would have combined two of the largest medical health insurance carriers in the U.S. in a $54 billion deal. The decision comes after a D.C. court order enjoining the transaction. The district court found that the merger would decrease competition and lessen choices in the health insurance market and that the competitive harm could not be offset (see Swan song for Anthem’s acquisition of Cigna?, Health Law Daily, February 9, 2017). In 2015, proposed mergers were announced between four of the five largest health insurance companies in the United States. In addition to Anthem’s proposed acquisition of Cigna, Aetna, Inc. attempted to purchase Humana Inc., and the subject quickly came under scrutiny (see To merge or not to merge, that was the question before a Senate subcommittee, Health Law Daily, September 24, 2015).

In Cigna’s announcement about the merger termination, the company noted that its decision was based on its belief that the proposed merger would not have been approved. To effect termination, Cigna filed a complaint in the Delaware Court of Chancery seeking declaratory judgment that it lawfully terminated the merger agreement and that Anthem is not permitted to extend the termination date. Cigna’s complaint seeks payment by Anthem of the $1.85 billion reverse termination fee contemplated in the merger agreement, as well as additional damages in an amount exceeding $13 billion. In response, Anthem sought a temporary restraining order in the same court to enjoin Cigna from terminating and taking any actions contrary to the terms of the proposed merger agreement. Anthem contended that there was still sufficient time to meet the merger agreement date of April 30, 2017, and that the merger would save more than $2 billion in annual medical costs for consumers. Anthem also provided a long list comparing the carrier’s interests in proceeding with the merger and Cigna’s interest in avoiding it.

In addition to Cigna and Anthem’s announcements following the D.C. court ruling, Humana and Aetna recently terminated their pending merger agreement (see Aetna, Humana plan separate futures after dissolving merger plans, Health Law Daily, February 14, 2017; Aetna’s $47 billion purchase of Humana enjoined, Health Law Daily, January 23, 2017). Under the terms of the merger agreement, Humana is entitled to a “breakup fee” of $1 billion, or approximately $630 million, net of tax. Of note, in order to demonstrate that its proposed merger with Humana would not run afoul of antitrust issues similar to the now contentious Anthem-Cigna merger, Aetna had pulled out of some health insurance exchanges for the upcoming enrollment period. Humana has now stated its intent to pull out of the exchanges for 2018. President Trump weighed in on the pullout, repeating the “repeal and replace” mantra. The pullout is based on Humana’s analysis of data associated with the company’s exchange membership following the 2017 open enrollment period, and what it perceived as future uncertainty in the risk pool.

Highlight on Maine: Able-bodied MaineCare recipients could be subject to more stringent requirements

“Able-bodied adults” would be subject to work/education requirements and a lifetime limit of five years under changes Mary Mayhew, director of the Maine Department of Health and Human Services, proposed to Maine’s Medicaid program, MaineCare. In a letter to HHS Secretary Tom Price, Mayhew said she would be seeking the changes in a forthcoming formal 1115 demonstration waiver request.

Mayhew’s letter comes at the heels of a referendum campaign to expand Medicaid in Maine at, according to Mayhew, a cost of $400 million over the next five years. A second motivation is the apparently sympathetic Trump Administration, which has proposed replacing Medicaid with block grants.

Mayhew said that the state has expanded its Medicaid program over decades, resulting in the use of hundreds of millions of state dollars “to turn Medicaid into an entitlement program for working-age, able-bodied adults.” MaineCare serves 270,000 individuals, just over 20 percent of Maine’s population, which, Mayhew said, represents a 22 percent reduction in enrollment since 2011.

Mayhew’s Medicaid proposals include the following:

  • work or education requirements for able-bodied adults in the Medicaid program, similar to the work requirements for Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) or Able-Bodied Adults Without Dependents (ABAWDs) in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP);
  • a five-year lifetime limitation on able-bodied adults’ eligibility for Medicaid;
  • limiting non-emergency transportation (NET) to situations where the underlying service to or from which individuals are being transported is a required Medicaid service and requiring them to access existing transportation resources before accessing NET;
  • requiring monthly premiums for adults who are able to earn income;
  • requiring monthly coinsurance of a set amount (approximately $20) for all members, cost-sharing of $20 for using the emergency department, and fees for missed appointments;
  • applying a reasonable asset test to Medicaid; and
  • waiver of the retroactive coverage of services incurred during the 90 days before Medicaid eligibility.

 

Aetna, Humana plan separate futures after dissolving merger plans

Aetna Inc. and Humana Inc. announced the termination of their merger agreement as a mutual decision following a January 2017 federal district court ruling enjoining the merger. Aetna is now on the hook for a $1 billion “breakup fee” to Humana, as well as a termination fee for ending its agreement to sell Medicare Advantage (MA) assets to Molina Healthcare, Inc. (Molina).

Merger enjoined

In the decision enjoining the merger, the D.C. District Court focused on the merger’s impact in the MA market, and believed that the divestiture of some MA assets was insufficient to alleviate antitrust concerns (see Aetna’s $47 billion purchase of Humana enjoined, January 23, 2017). The Molina deal involved two separate agreements with the merging companies, which would have resulted in Molina gaining about 290,000 MA members for a total of about $117 million in cash. The federal government also challenged the merger’s potential anticompetitive effect on the health insurance marketplaces, even after Aetna’s withdrawal from the marketplaces in 11 states for the 2017 plan year. The court agreed with the government, finding that Aetna withdrew from competing in the 17 complaint counties for 2017 specifically to evade judicial scrutiny of the merger.

Aetna

Aetna’s Chairman and CEO Mark Bertolini stated that pursuing the merger further would be “too challenging,” despite Aetna’s belief that a combined company would benefit consumers. Bertolini noted that the companies have spent 19 months planning the deal, and spoke of Aetna and Humana’s mutual respect. Although the companies will now move forward separately, they share the goal of moving toward a health system centered on consumer needs.

On or about March 16, 2017, Aetna will redeem a large number of senior notes for cash, all of which were due at some point from June 2019 through June 2046. Aetna will fund this redemption with the proceeds of notes issued last year.

Humana

Humana’s initial press release was briefer than Aetna’s, announcing the mutual termination of the agreement and the expectation of receiving about $630 million from Aetna’s breakup fee payment, after tax. Humana expects to release 2017 financial guidance and a strategic plan update.

OCR shows no signs of slowing HIPAA enforcement

The HHS Office for Civil Rights (OCR) is on pace to have another record-breaking year for enforcement actions against covered entities (CEs) and business associates (BAs) accused of Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) (P.L. 104-191) violations. As of February 13, 2017, it had already entered into two resolution agreements with CEs and imposed civil monetary penalties (CMPs) on another for only the third time in its history. Prior to 2016, the OCR had not entered into more than six resolution agreements with CEs or BAs in single year. As of December 2016, the OCR had entered into twice that number. As of February 13, 2016, the OCR had just imposed its second CMP, but had not yet entered into any resolution agreements.

The agency kicked off the year by entering into a $475,000 resolution agreement with Presence Health. Unlike past agreements that settled potential violations of the HIPAA Privacy and Security Rules, the Present Health resolution represented the OCR’s first agreement to resolve potential violations of the HIPAA Breach Notification Rule. Presence failed to notify the OCR, affected individuals, and the media that paper-based operating schedules containing the protected health information (PHI) of 836 individuals had gone missing in the statutorily-required 60-day timeline for breaches affecting more than 500 individuals; instead, it waited more than 100 days.

Eight days later, the OCR announced a $2.2 million resolution agreement with MAPFRE Life Insurance Company of Puerto Rico for Security Rule violations affecting the data of 2,209 individuals. The OCR determined that MAPFRE failed to perform a risk analysis, implement risk management plans, and encrypt data stored in removable storage media led to a breach caused when a thief stole a USB data storage device containing electronic PHI (ePHI).

In early February, the OCR announced that it had issued a final determination and imposed a $3.2 million CMP on Children’s Medical Center of Dallas due to a pattern of noncompliance with the Security rule. Children’s suffered a breach in 2010 due to the loss of an unencrypted, non-password-protected BlackBerry device containing the ePHI of 3,800 individuals.  It suffered a second breach in 2013; despite the first breach, Children’s had failed to encrypt a laptop containing the ePHI of 2,462 individuals that was later stolen. The agency determined that the CMP was merited based on Children’s failure to implement risk management plans, in contravention of prior recommendations to do so, and its failure to encrypt mobile devices, storage media, and workstations. The OCR also imposed CMPs against Lincare, Inc., a home health company, in 2016 and against Cignet Health in Prince George’s County, Maryland, in 2011.

The agency stepped up enforcement efforts in 2016, in part due to negative reports regarding its performance from the HHS OIG and the Government Accountability Office (GAO). It began the Phase 2 audit process, targeting both CEs and BAs, and announced its intention to allocate resources for the first time to investigate complaints of breaches affecting 500 individuals or fewer. It appears geared to continue, if not ramp up, its enforcement efforts, but the impact of newly appointed HHS Secretary Thomas E. Price, M.D.–who will appoint a new OCR director–remains to be seen. Price, a physician and former Congressional representative has historically opposed government regulatory activity of physicians. However, Adam H. Greene, Partner at Davis Wright Tremaine, suggests that, although Price the physician may dislike HIPAA, “his personal views will [not] necessarily lead to a significant change in enforcement.”