Kusserow on Compliance: CMS to issue new Medicare card to 60 million beneficiaries

New cards will no longer contain Social Security number

Over 2.5 million beneficiaries are victims of identity theft incidents

CMS is readying a fraud prevention initiative that removes Social Security numbers from Medicare cards to help combat identity theft, and safeguard taxpayer dollars.  This is being done to meet the congressional deadline for replacing all Medicare cards by April 2019 that followed the passage of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA). CMS will assign all Medicare beneficiaries a new, unique a Medicare Beneficiary Identifier (MBI) number which will contain a combination of numbers and uppercase letters. Beneficiaries will be instructed to safely and securely destroy their current Medicare cards and keep the new MBI confidential. Issuance of the new MBI will not change the benefits a Medicare beneficiary receives and will be designed to help protect against personal identity theft affects a large and growing number of seniors.  According to the DOJ, people age 65 or older are increasingly the victims of this type of crime that now are estimated to affect 2.6 million seniors a year. Two-thirds of all identity theft victims reported a direct financial loss with also the problems associated with disrupting lives, damage credit ratings, and result in inaccuracies in medical records and costly false claims.

New card will be mailed beginning in April 2018 and will use the unique, randomly-assigned MIB number to replace the Social Security-based Health Insurance Claim Number (HICN) currently used on the Medicare card.  Providers and beneficiaries will both be able to use secure look up tools that will support quick access to MBIs when they need them. There will also be a 21-month transition period where providers will be able to use either the MBI or the HICN further easing the transition.

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

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Copyright © 2017 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.

Kusserow on Compliance: OIG proposed budget for 2018 cites accomplishments

The HHS OIG submitted their fiscal year (FY) 2018 proposed budget for a total of $359 million that includes $291 million to support oversight of the Medicare and Medicaid programs.  In justifying their request, the OIG reported expected recoveries of more than $5.66 billion for FY 2016 that includes $4.46 billion in investigative receivables and approximately $82 million in CMPs. The OIG’s work also prevents fraud and abuse through industry outreach and guidance and recommendations to HHS to remedy program vulnerabilities. Additionally, OIG reported on its role as a Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control (HCFAC) program participant in returning $5 to the Medicare Trust Funds for every $1 invested in FY 2016. The OIG reported 844 criminal actions against individuals or organizations that engaged in crimes against HHS programs and 708 civil and administrative enforcement actions, including False Claims Act lawsuits filed in Federal district court, and Civil Monetary Penalty (CMP) law settlements. The OIG excluded 3,635 individuals and organizations from participation in Federal health care programs. The OIG is also part of Health Care Fraud Strike Force teams that coordinate operations conducted jointly by Federal, State, and local law enforcement entities that resulted in filing of charges against 255 individuals or entities, 207 criminal actions, and $321 million in investigative receivables.

Over the last five years, the OIG’s expected recoveries have averaged $5.3 billion annually. Changes in the amount of expected recoveries from year to year are due to the particular mix of cases resolved in a given year, as well as continued efforts to work with operating divisions to implement OIG recommendations.

 

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

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Copyright © 2017 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.

Kusserow on Compliance: OCR has a record number of significant settlements so far in 2017

The HHS Office for Civil Rights (OCR) has posted about 2,000 major breaches and more than a quarter million small breaches since 2009. The common denominator for many of the cases in which there was a settlement was that the covered entity or business associate (BA) suffered one or more breaches affecting more than 500 individuals sometime between 2011 and 2013. The OCR has jumped off the 2017 year with a record number of significant settlements. The most recent is CardioNet, a wireless health services provider, who provides remote mobile monitoring of and rapid response to patients at risk for cardiac arrhythmias. The provider entered into a settlement for $2.5 million and implemented a corrective action plan for disclosure of unsecured ePHI on a laptop that was stolen from a parked car. CardioNet had an insufficient risk analysis and risk management processes in place at the time of the theft and their HIPAA Security Rule policies and procedures had not been implemented. The OCR has entered into a number of other significant settlements. Others who paid settlements for violating HIPAA requirements so far this year include Memorial Health Systems ($5.5 million); Children’s Medical Center in Dallas ($3.2 million); MAPFRE, a Puerto Rico life insurance company ($2.2 million); Presence Health in Chicago ($475,000); and Community Provider Network of Denver ($400,000). In all these cases, there was the requirement to take corrective actions.

2016 OCR Results

  • There were 329 Data Breaches greater than 500 Individuals (a new record).
  • 225 OCR Phase 2 of HIPAA compliance audits conducted of covered entities and BAs.
  • No onsite audits were conducted.
  • No findings or notifications from the audits have been made.
  • The OCR intends to use the results from these audits to prepare for a new and better tool in the future.
  • There was a large jump in fines imposed for HIPAA violations that totaled about $24 million (versus a little more than $6 and $8 million in for 2105 and 2014 respectively)

OCR in 2017

  • The OCR stated intention is to conduct only a few onsite audits in 2017.
  • To date the OCR has nearly achieved the level of 2016 in terms of penalties imposed.
  • To date about 100 data breaches impacting greater than 500 Individuals have been reported.
  • About a half million individuals have been impacted in reported data breaches so far this year.
  • Only a relatively few BAs were involved in any of the reported data breaches.

The enforcement actions most often come from the OCR when investigations into the root cause of the breach found systemic, often profound, failures of organizational programs to safeguard protected health information.  This includes the failure to perform an information security risk assessment or to have a risk management plan to address gaps in the safeguards for information systems, both required actions under the HIPAA Security Rule. Tied to this has been insufficient development of policies and procedures for HIPAA Compliance.  Other actionable problems that resulted in the OCR imposing HIPAA corrective action plans (CAP) included inappropriate delay in data breach reporting (reported after 60 days from the date of discovery); and inappropriate oversight into user set up and user management. There is also the continuing problem of organizations not implementing encryption technology on mobile devices.

Camella Boateng, a HIPAA consultant reminds everyone that the recently enacted 21st Century Cures Act amends the HITECH Act to extend an individual’s right to access their PHI to data held by business associates. As such, it is more important than ever that entities give a priority for engaging in a self-audit, so vulnerabilities can be detected and resolved before they come to the attention of the government. Furthermore, with a shifting focus toward BA, it is important to avoid any potential partner that will not commit to signing a BAA.

Strong HIPAA Compliance Program Evidence

  • HIPAA policies and procedures;
  • HIPAA requests forms for patient’s rights;
  • a complete notice of privacy practices;
  • established technical, physical, and administrative safeguards;
  • conducting a regular HIPAA risk analysis;
  • developed a risk management plan to address gaps in the safeguards for PHI;
  • strong workforce education;
  • effective user management and oversight into systems with PHI;
  • auditing practices for verification of compliance;
  • ongoing evaluation of current safeguards established by the organization;
  • strong oversight into user set up and user management;
  • implementing encryption technology on mobile devices; and
  • ensuring partners have signed BAAs.

 

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on
Google+ or LinkedIn.

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Copyright © 2017 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.

Kusserow on Compliance: OIG Work Plan now being updated monthly

The OIG announced that its work planning process is being modified to be more dynamic and to reflect the adjustments being made throughout the year in response to changing priorities and responding to new emerging issues. The OIG, as of June 15, 2017, will now adjust its Work Plan on a monthly basis, rather than semi-annually as has been done previously to ensure that it more closely aligns with the work planning process. The monthly updates will include the addition of newly initiated Work Plan items and the removal of completed items.

The Work Plan sets forth various audits and evaluations that are underway or planned during the fiscal year and beyond. Projects listed in the Work Plan span the Department and include CMS, public health agencies such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and National Institutes of Health (NIH), and human resources agencies such as Administration for Children and Families (ACF) and the Administration on Aging. The OIG also plans work related to issues that cut across departmental programs, including State and local governments’ use of Federal funds, as well as the functional areas of the Office of the HHS Secretary. In conducting its work, the OIG assesses relative risks in HHS programs and operations to identify those areas most in need of attention. In evaluating potential projects to undertake, the OIG considers a number of factors, including mandates set forth in laws, regulations, or other directives; requests by Congress, HHS management, or the Office of Management and Budget; top management and performance challenges facing HHS; work performed by other oversight organizations (e.g., GAO); management’s actions to implement OIG recommendations from previous reviews; and potential for positive impact.

New Projects Added

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on Google+ or LinkedIn.

Subscribe to the Kusserow on Compliance Newsletter

Copyright © 2017 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.