Kusserow on Compliance: OIG program exclusions reported for second half of 2019

Total of 2640 new exclusions added to the LEIE in 2019

Under the Social Security Act, the HHS Office of Inspector General (OIG) is able to exclude individuals and entities from participation in Medicare, Medicaid, and other Federal health care programs. Exclusions are required (mandatory exclusion) for individuals and entities convicted of the following types of criminal offenses: (1) Medicare or Medicaid fraud; (2) patient abuse or neglect; (3) felonies for other health care fraud; and (4) felonies for illegal manufacture, distribution, prescription, or dispensing of controlled substances. The OIG is also authorized (permissive exclusion) to exclude individuals and entities on several other grounds, including misdemeanors for other health care fraud (other than Medicare or Medicaid); suspension or revocation of a license to provide health care for reasons bearing on professional competence, professional performance or financial integrity; provision of unnecessary or substandard services; submission of false or fraudulent claims to a federal health care program; or engaging in unlawful kickback arrangements. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) added another basis for imposing a permissive exclusion, that is, knowingly making, or causing to be made, any false statements or omissions in any application, bid, or contract to participate as a provider in a federal health care program, including managed care programs under Medicare and Medicaid, as well as Medicare’s prescription drug program.

During this semiannual reporting period, the OIG excluded 1,347 individuals and entities from Medicare, Medicaid, and other federal health care programs. Most of the exclusions resulted from convictions for crimes relating to Medicare or Medicaid, patient abuse or neglect, financial misconduct, controlled substances, or as a result of license revocation. The OIG completed the deployment of a new service for State Medicaid Fraud Control Units (MFCUs) to report convictions through a central web-based portal for exclusion. This improved reporting from those agencies. A list of excluded individuals and entities can be found at https://exclusions.oig.hhs.gov/.

 

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

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Copyright © 2020 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.

Kusserow on Compliance: Huge fraud schemes involving telemedicine and DME

– Charges against two dozen people involving over $1.2 billion

 – Administrative Action against 130 DMEs submitting $1.7 Billion in claims

The DOJ announced charges against 24 defendants—including the CEOs, COOs, and others associated with five telemedicine companies, the owners of dozens of durable medical equipment (DME) companies, and three licensed medical professionals—associated with health care fraud schemes involving more than $1.2 billion. CMS and the Center for Program Integrity (CPI) have taken adverse administrative action against 130 DME companies that had submitted over $1.7 billion in claims and were paid over $900 million. The scheme involved payment of illegal kickbacks and bribes by DME companies in exchange for the referral of Medicare beneficiaries by medical professionals working with fraudulent telemedicine companies for back, shoulder, wrist, and knee braces that were medically unnecessary.

The DOJ alleges those charged with paying doctors to prescribe DME either without any patient interaction or with only a brief telephonic conversation with patients they had never met or seen. The proceeds of the fraudulent scheme were allegedly laundered through international shell corporations and used to purchase exotic automobiles, yachts, and luxury real estate in the United States and abroad. Some of the defendants obtained patients for the scheme by using an international call center that advertised to Medicare beneficiaries and “up-sold” the beneficiaries to get them to accept numerous “free or low-cost” DME braces, regardless of medical necessity. The international call center allegedly paid illegal kickbacks and bribes to telemedicine companies to obtain DME orders for these Medicare beneficiaries. The telemedicine companies then allegedly paid physicians to write medically unnecessary DME orders. Finally, the international call center sold the DME orders that it obtained from the telemedicine companies to DME companies, which fraudulently billed Medicare. Collectively, the CEOs, COOs, executives, business owners and medical professionals involved in the conspiracy are accused of causing over $1 billion in loss.

 

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on Google+ or LinkedIn.

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Copyright © 2019 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.

Kusserow on Compliance: Most organizations reported encounters with government authorities

• Most organizations have made disclosures for HIPAA breaches and overpayments
• One third received demand letters
• Other encounters report were with OIG and DOJ

It is widely recognized that regulatory and legal enforcement activities have been increasing over the last few years. The results should be a warning bell to all compliance officers that regulators and enforcement officials are right around the corner, necessitating increased efforts on ongoing monitoring and auditing to mitigate exposure of compliance-related risk areas. In the soon to be released national healthcare “2019 Compliance Benchmark Survey” most respondents reported having encountered issues with government agencies in last five years. Ranking at the top, with nearly two-thirds of the respondents, was disclosure to the HHS Office for Civil Rights (OCR) for breaches of privacy under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). Over half reported making self-disclosures of overpayments received and addressing audits or investigations by government agencies. One-third reported responding to a demand letter from a government agency or contractor. Serious legal encounters with the government was reported at a much lower level.  One out of five respondents reported self-disclosure to the DOJ, OIG and CMS.  About one out of eight respondents reported their organization being involved in the settlement process with DOJ, self-disclosing to the OIG engagement of sanctioned individuals/entities, and being involved in a settlement process for a corporate integrity agreement (CIA).

The “2019 Compliance Benchmark Survey” report will be available without charge at the upcoming HCCA conference in Boston at Strategic Management Services, Booth 420. 

 

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on Google+ or LinkedIn.

Subscribe to the Kusserow on Compliance Newsletter

Copyright © 2019 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.

Kusserow on Compliance: 2018 FCA enforcement and 10 tips for channeling whistleblowers internally

 New health care qui tam cases average 9 per week

$2.5 billion in recoveries from health care sector

75 percent of cases predicated by “Whistleblowers”

Whistleblowers are entitled to up to 25 percent of recoveries

The vast majority of False Claims Act cases are brought to the DOJ by “whistleblowers” (qui tam relators), under the qui tam provisions of the False Claims Act (FCA). In 2018, this continued to be the case. The DOJ’s Civil Division reported having 645 new qui tam actions initiated last year, at an average of 14 new cases per month. Of that total, 446 were health care cases—about nine a week average. Federal recoveries, including settlements and judgments, amounted to over $2.8 billion. Most of this, over $2.5 billion, related to health care and life sciences. FCA violations occur when someone knowingly submits a false or fraudulent claim for payment to the government.  The penalty for doing this is up to three times the amount of each claim, plus penalties as high as $21,563 per claim. Whistleblowers file cases with the DOJ on behalf of the United States as well as themselves and must provide all the evidence they have supporting the complaint. The DOJ decides to intervene (take over prosecution) or not. If the DOJ decides to intervene, the government takes the lead in prosecuting the case; and if not, the relator may proceed with the prosecution on their own in federal court.  The relator is entitled to 15 to 25 percent of the government’s recovery, plus attorneys’ fees and expenses.

The recovery results in 2108 marked the ninth consecutive years where recoveries have exceeded $2 billion. Of the health care recoveries, more than three quarters of that sum were as result of qui tam cases. Health care and life sciences settlements involved drug and device manufacturers, hospitals, Medicare Advantage plans, pharmacies, and laboratories. The largest settlement, for $625 million, was with AmerisourceBergen Corp. and its subsidiaries, and it involved resolution of allegations that it repackaged and resold cancer drugs to profit from “overfill” in the original packaging. The other major settlements also involve pharmaceutical manufacturers. In those cases, the FCA was violated as result of payment of kickbacks to induce the flow of business.  The largest case among providers involved an independent physician association that entered into a $270 million settlement with another case resulting in a $216 million settlement with the former hospital chain, Health Management Associates.

10 Tips: Channeling Whistleblowers Internally 

  1. Review/update hotline-related polices/procedures (confidentiality, anonymity, non-retaliation, duty to report, etc.)
  2. Promote the reporting of wrongdoing (newsletter, intranet, training programs, etc.)
  3. Find ways to provide feedback so that employees know reporting is taken seriously
  4. Consider engaging experts to evaluate compliance communication channels effectiveness
  5. Allegations of potential violations of law or regulations must be promptly investigated.
  6. Ensure that individuals are trained and competent to conduct prompt investigations.
  7. All cases where investigation indicates potential violations, disclose promptly
  8. Take appropriate disciplinary action against identified wrongdoers
  9. Understand CMS and OIG self-disclosure protocols that may avoid FCA investigation
  10. Ensue investigations finding of potential violations of law are promptly disclosed to the DOJ

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on Google+ or LinkedIn.

Subscribe to the Kusserow on Compliance Newsletter

Copyright © 2019 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.