Kusserow on Compliance: Tips for getting the most from your CIA

This was the title of a section in a presentation by Laura Ellis, HHS Office of Inspector General (OIG) Senior Counsel, at the recent Health Care Compliance Association (HCCA) Compliance Institute, where she explained that the settlement process is very lengthy, and that compliance officers should spend that time period preparing for what is to come. Even before matters are referred to the OIG for settlement negotiations, the matter will have been with the Department of Justice (DOJ) for a long time.  It is only after the DOJ turns matters over to the OIG that the agency determines whether or not a corporate integrity agreement (CIA) is necessary, and if so, what terms and condition should be included in the agreement.  Ellis stated that negotiations with the OIG may take up to a year before a CIA emerges.   It is during this rather long lead-up period that the compliance officer should be very busy preparing for what is to come.  Ellis offered a number of suggestions for the compliance officer to follow while this process is underway, including:

Thomas Herrmann, J.D., was previously responsible for negotiating CIAs on behalf of the OIG and in providing monitors with a number of years’ consulting experience, working with more than a dozen clients with CIAs and as an Independent Review Organization (IRO). He agreed with the Ellis statement about the long lead time before a CIA is signed, and that the compliance officer should not waste that valuable time.  Once executed, the clock begins ticking and a lot has to be accomplished in a relatively short time.   Among the most important tasks needing immediate attention is finding and vetting potential outside experts to be the IRO and, in some cases, compliance experts for the Board and quality monitors. The responsibility for selecting these experts lies with the organization, not the OIG.  This may take a lot of time and warrants serious consideration as in all likelihood, the organization will have them for five years.  A mistake in selection will come back to haunt the organization and may aggravate matters with the OIG.  The compliance officer should be very much involved in finding and selecting the right experts with the right expertise.   The more experience the firm selected has in performing this type of work, the less likely there will be problems.  An experienced firm won’t have the learning curve of an inexpert firm that oftentimes adds cost to the engagement and results in poor reports to the OIG.  For an organization that is already in hot water with the DOJ and OIG, this kind of complicating matter is not wanted.

Carrie Kusserow has over 15 years’ compliance officer and consultant experience, and was brought in to be the compliance officer to an organization under a CIA while Laura Ellis was the monitor. Kusserow echoes Ellis’ advice to organizations to take steps to “get the most out of the money” expended on these resources. The more expert they are in the health care sector, the better.  The more experience the individuals assigned to do the work have, particularly experience with the OIG, the better.   The one thing to avoid is hiring an IRO and then paying it to learn about the type of work being done by the organization or how to interact with the OIG. Having top-notch experts can impart considerable added value from prior experience of doing this kind of work. She also pointed out that once these outside experts are engaged, there is another lag period before they begin their work and again when they present reports on the results of their work.  It is a huge mistake to allow these gap periods to elapse without doing serious preparation work.  It is important to begin planning at the earliest date for what is needed to meet CIA terms and conditions, which will assist in this effort, and development of a project plan for execution.   The planning process and timelines for meeting CIA requirements will have to take into account when reports by the IRO, and possibly the compliance expert, are due to the OIG.

Steve Forman, CPA, has over 35 years’ experience, having served as both as a compliance officer and as an IRO many times, and as a compliance expert four times under a CIA. He advises compliance officers that one step that cannot be undertaken too soon is getting the Executive/Management Compliance Committee and Board Compliance Committee involved. They need to understand fully in practical and operational terms their personal obligations, along with what is needed from them to meet CIA obligations.   He also strongly recommends at the first indication that a CIA may be in the future to begin reviewing posted agreements on the OIG website, especially those that involve similar types of organizations.   One point of caution is that the OIG has been changing CIAs significantly as to new requirements, conditions, and certifications by board members and executives. Information derived from these reviews should be translated into a plan of action to ensure the organization is in tune with what the OIG will expect.  He strongly suggests that compliance officers consider engage compliance experts to do two things:

  1. Have the compliance program conduct an independent evaluation and act on findings and recommendations. Having such a report with evidence of correcting any deficiencies can be invaluable evidence to the OIG in making a determination as to whether a CIA is necessary and, if so, mitigating terms and conditions. It will be looking for this evidence.
  2. Once a CIA is executed, immediately engage experts to conduct a mock audit to test the terms and conditions that must be met under the CIA and to have them addressed before the IRO or compliance expert under the CIA begins work.

Taking these two steps can avoid a lot of problems, expenditures and complications under a CIA. The OIG takes evidence of independent experts serious. That is why they rely upon them as IROs, Compliance Experts, and Quality Monitors.

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

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Kusserow on Compliance: Compliance officers should have active roles in CIA negotiations

Laura Ellis, HHS Office of Inspector General (OIG) Senior Counsel, has a reputation for managing the most difficult and complicated corporate integrity agreements (CIAs) on behalf of the OIG. At the recent Health Care Compliance Association (HCCA) Compliance Institute, she urged compliance officers not to sit on the sidelines while a CIA is being negotiated with the OIG.   They should be actively involved in all facets of negotiation and should not wait to be involved until the agreement is signed and put into effect. She reminded everyone that once the CIA is signed, the compliance officer will be the face of the company to the OIG, not the attorneys.   From years of experience, she has found attorneys negotiating terms and conditions of a CIA often don’t have the operational experience to fully understand all the implications of what is being committed to in terms and obligation. As a result, it is not uncommon for attorneys to come back to the OIG after a CIA has been executed to try to renegotiate points.   This is triggered as result of management and the compliance officer realizing what is involved in meeting the terms and condition.   Ellis stated that the OIG is not inclined to reopen CIA negotiations.  The mistake was not having the compliance officer on the front end of negotiations and present during the negotiation process.  As the CIA settlement process takes shape, the compliance officer needs to:

  • be part of the negotiations;
  • review and comment on all drafts;
  • create a basic plan from the draft to determine what it takes to meet obligations;
  • conduct a min-gap assessment of what it takes to do what the CIA would require;
  • begin work on implementation strategies; and
  • start the process to determine resource needs to meet obligations.

Ellis also made the point that attitude matters once a CIA is in place, and compliance officers should work with the monitor in an open and honest way. A positive working relationship between the monitor and the compliance officer is to everyone’s best interest.  The earlier in the process that they get to know each other, the better.

Thomas Herrmann, J.D., was previously responsible on behalf of the OIG for negotiating CIAs and providing monitors, and subsequently gained many years of consulting experience working with more than a dozen clients with CIAs and as an independent review organization (IRO).  He says that what many fail to understand is that, although the OIG is involved in the Department of Justice (DOJ) settlement process, a different OIG attorney will be assigned as negotiator for the CIA.  Once the agreement is executed, it is passed on to a different OIG attorney to be the monitor to assure compliance with the terms of the CIA.   A very common mistake is for attorneys to deal with issues handled by someone earlier in the process, or in effect, re-litigate.  This is a big mistake.  The OIG will not re-litigate or interpret decisions made by the DOJ.  At the same time, the OIG monitor is definitely disinclined to deal with issues that were or should have been addressed with the OIG negotiator.  Herrmann goes on to explains that the OIG views the organization’s legal counsel as filling an adversarial role, but once things are executed, the OIG does not want to continue dealing with the advocate.  The focus of the relationship with the OIG should be on meeting the terms of the CIA. Herrmann sees it as a huge mistake for the legal counsel to continue making arguments or try to modify terms with the monitor, as this frequently leads to aggravation of matters and creates additional problems for the organization.  The monitor wants to deal with how the organization will meet its obligations, and that means working with the compliance officer to determine how the terms and conditions of the CIA will be fulfilled.  It behooves compliance officers to get to know their monitor as quickly as possible, evidence their commitment, and exhibit an attitude to work out what it takes to get the job done.

Carrie Kusserow has over 15 years’ compliance officer and consultant experience; in fact, she was brought in to be the compliance officer to an organization under a CIA while Laura Ellis was the monitor. Her experience with Ellis was precisely what Ellis explained during her presentation.   Maintaining the focus on meeting the obligations of the agreement is very important for credibility and permits ironing out of issues. By listening carefully and responding to Ellis’ questions openly in a forthright manner, Kusserow developed a very good working relationship.  This made work easier for everyone.  Compliance officers need to listen carefully to what the monitor expresses, working as needed and then immediately following up to report actions taken. The focus must stay on getting the job done to the satisfaction of the OIG.  It is also critical that the compliance officer at all times be “straight up” and honest with the OIG.  If this is done, then a bond of trust can be developed that can iron out details that are sure to arise. This can permit seeking non-adversarial clarification of terms and conditions. On the other hand, failing to develop a proper working relationship with the monitor can result in lack of understanding and increased work for everyone. As such, as soon as the CIA is signed, the compliance officer should come into direct contact with the OIG monitor.

Suzanne Castaldo, J.D., has worked both as a litigator and compliance consultant dealing with numerous organizations with CIAs. She confirmed what Ellis noted about attorneys negotiating with the OIG without active involvement of either management or the compliance officer. In almost every case, it has created avoidable issues.  She strongly recommends that anyone engaging a law firm to assist with CIA negotiations insist on including knowledgeable members of management and the compliance officer in all meetings with the OIG.  All terms that are being negotiated should be reviewed and assessed by them to understand all implications and resulting work obligations. Many attorneys will not find this to their liking and may argue against it.   However, not being part of this process reminds one of “arriving at the dance after it is over.”

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on Google+ or LinkedIn.

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Copyright © 2017 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.

 

Kusserow on Compliance: OIG announces changes in provisions in corporate integrity agreements

Free Upcoming Webinar! Compliance Accountability: Lessons Learned From Implementing Corporate Integrity Agreements

At the now-concluded Health Care Compliance Association (HCCA) conference, representatives of the HHS Office of Inspector General (OIG) spoke about the changing provisions in the OIG’s Corporate Integrity Agreements (CIAs). They provided an up-to-date perspective on the agency’s priorities and concerns, as well as what they individually believe is necessary for effective oversight and operational controls for health care organizations. Many of the provisions included in new CIAs have been included for many years, but there are also many evolving provisions that have been added. CIAs include a stipulated penalty for each day the organization is out of compliance with deadlines and a $50,000 penalty for each false certification. As with any representations to the government, any false certification may implicate the False Claims Act. Compliance Officers need to understand what CIA requirements are, in order to brief executive leadership and the Board on what is expected of them by the OIG. Failing to meet the obligations under the agreement can result in severe penalties, including possible exclusion of participation in federal health care programs.

Evolving provisions

The upcoming free webinar on Compliance Accountability: Lessons Learned From Implementing Corporate Integrity Agreements will address these evolving provisions in the CIAs and will be a great takeaway for use in educating executive leadership and Boards on what is expected of them in supporting and providing oversight for their Compliance Program. Register today!

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on Google+ or LinkedIn.

Subscribe to the Kusserow on Compliance Newsletter

Copyright © 2017 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.

Kusserow on Compliance: OIG warns board of consequences for failing to meet compliance oversight responsibilities

CIAs are rapidly changing with additional provisions that include Board members

Upcoming webinar will address the full range of changes in CIAs

At the Health Care Compliance Association (HCCA) conference just concluding, the HHS Office of Inspector General (OIG) warned that in working out terms and conditions of a Corporate Integrity Agreement (CIA), the OIG will look for evidence of whether the Board was actively involved in oversight of the compliance program. If it determines that the Board was derelict in meeting its fiduciary responsibilities, the OIG will consider that a contributing factor that led to the need for government intervention. The weaker the Board oversight, the more stringent the requirements that are placed on the Board in the settlement agreement. In cases where the OIG finds that the Board has not been providing the proper oversight of the compliance program, the OIG will add mandates for personal certifications of Board members regarding the compliance program that includes mandated certifications by individual Board members on the effectiveness of the program. To ensure that Boards are attentive to this responsibility, the OIG may require the Board to engage a Compliance Expert to assist in meeting the Board’s obligations and the report made part of each Annual Report filing. These provisions place a heavy personal burden on Boards. Furthermore, CIAs often include a stipulated penalty for non-compliance with deadlines, as well as $50,000 penalties for each false certification that may also implicate the False Claims Act.

For 20 years, the OIG has been calling for a “top-down” compliance program, beginning at the Board level, that includes issuing White Papers, such as “Practical Guidance for Health Care Governing Boards on Compliance Oversight,” and emphasizing holding Boards more accountable for proper oversight of compliance within organizations. Language from these pronouncements about Board obligations and use of Compliance Experts is now included in CIAs.

Tips for Compliance Officers

  1. Review OIG “White Papers” and new CIAs to lean what the OIG considers as best practices for boards
  1. Educate and warn the Board on their fiduciary obligations and personal consequences for failing to meet them.
  1. Suggest the Board include someone who is “compliance literate” that knows what questions to be asked and assess program effectiveness (e.g., compliance officer experience or a compliance consultant).
  1. Provide the Board with solid evidence concerning the operation of the compliance program, such as engaging a Compliance Expert to assess and evaluate the program and providing the Board with evidence of an active program and identifying opportunities for improvement.

Register now to attend a free webinar on Thursday, April 6, 2017 titled “Compliance Accountability: Lessons Learned from Implementing Corporate Integrity Agreements” and presented by Thomas Herrmann, JD, former Chief of the Litigation Branch for the OIG and Appellate Judge for Medicare Appeals, along with Carrie Kusserow, MBA, CHC, CHPC, CCEP, who has 15 years’ experience as a compliance officer and consultant. Both are experts on compliance programs, as well as meeting the terms and obligations of Corporate Integrity Agreements.

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on Google+ or LinkedIn.

Subscribe to the Kusserow on Compliance Newsletter

Copyright © 2017 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.